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Phosphorus Alleviation of Nitrogen-Suppressed Methane Sink in Global Grasslands
  • +14
  • Lihua Zhang,
  • Fenghui Yuan,
  • Junhong Bai,
  • Hongtao Duan,
  • Xueying Gu,
  • Longyu Hou,
  • Yao Huang,
  • Mingan Yang,
  • Jin-Sheng He,
  • Zhenhua Zhang,
  • Lijun Yu,
  • Changchun Song,
  • David Lipson,
  • Donatella Zona,
  • Walter Oechel,
  • Ivan Janssens,
  • Xiaofeng Xu
Lihua Zhang
Minzu University of China
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Fenghui Yuan
San Diego State University
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Junhong Bai
Beijing Normal University
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Hongtao Duan
Chinese Academy of Sciences
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Xueying Gu
Chinese Academy of Sciences
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Longyu Hou
Chinese Academy of Sciences
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Yao Huang
Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences
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Mingan Yang
San Diego State University
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Jin-Sheng He
Peking University
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Zhenhua Zhang
Chinese Academy of Sciences, Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology
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Lijun Yu
Chinese Academy of Sciences
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Changchun Song
Chinese Academy of Sciences Changchun Branch
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David Lipson
San Diego State University
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Donatella Zona
San Diego State University
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Walter Oechel
San Diego State University
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Ivan Janssens
University of Antwerp
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Xiaofeng Xu
San Diego State University
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Abstract

Grassland ecosystems account for more than 10% of the global CH4 sink in soils. A 4-year field experiment found that addition of P alone did not affect CH4 uptake and experimental addition of N alone significantly suppressed CH4 uptake, while concurrent N and P additions suppressed CH4 uptake to a lesser degree. A meta-analysis including 382 data points in global grasslands corroborated these findings. Global extrapolation with an empirical modeling approach estimated that contemporary N addition suppresses CH4 sink in global grassland by 11% and concurrent N and P deposition alleviates this suppression by 6%. The P alleviation of N-suppressed CH4 sink is primarily attributed to substrate competition, defined as the competition between ammonium and CH4 for the methane monooxygenase enzyme. The N and P impacts on CH4 uptake indicate that projected increases in N and P depositions might substantially affect CH4 uptake and alter the global CH4 cycle.

Peer review status:ACCEPTED

23 Dec 2019Submitted to Ecology Letters
02 Jan 2020Submission Checks Completed
02 Jan 2020Assigned to Editor
03 Jan 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
21 Jan 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
22 Jan 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Minor
26 Jan 20201st Revision Received
27 Jan 2020Submission Checks Completed
27 Jan 2020Assigned to Editor
27 Jan 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
27 Jan 2020Editorial Decision: Accept