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Current genetic engineering strategies for the production of anti-hypertensive ACEI peptides
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  • Carolina Gomes,
  • Diana Ferreira,
  • João Carvalho,
  • Carlos Barreto,
  • Joana Fernandes,
  • Marisol Gouveia,
  • Fernando Ribeiro,
  • Ana Duque,
  • Sandra Vieira
Carolina Gomes
Polish Academy of Science Institute of Plant Genetics
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Diana Ferreira
Universidade de Aveiro Instituto de Biomedicina
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João Carvalho
Universidade de Aveiro Instituto de Biomedicina
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Carlos Barreto
University of Coimbra Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology
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Joana Fernandes
Universidade de Aveiro Instituto de Biomedicina
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Marisol Gouveia
Universidade de Aveiro Instituto de Biomedicina
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Fernando Ribeiro
Universidade de Aveiro Instituto de Biomedicina
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Ana Duque
Universidade Nova de Lisboa Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica
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Sandra Vieira
Universidade de Aveiro Instituto de Biomedicina
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Abstract

Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, with high prevalence in low- and high-income countries. Among the various antihypertensive therapeutic strategies, synthetic Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) are one of the most used pharmacological agents. However, their use in hypertension therapy has been linked to various side effects. In recent years considerable research has been performed on the use of food-derived ACEI peptides (ACEIp) as antihypertensive agents. Although promising, the industrial production of these ACEIp through conventional methods, such as chemical synthesis and enzymatic hydrolysis of food proteins, has been proven troublesome and expensive. Limitations to the large-scale production of ACEIp for functional foods and supplements can be overcome by producing the precursors of these peptides in heterologous hosts. Bacterial hosts have been the privileged choice, particularly to test the success of the genetic engineering strategies, but new platforms based on plants and microalgae have also been emerging. This work provides an overview of the state of antihypertensive therapy, focusing on ACEI, illustrates the latest advances on ACEIp research, and describes current genetic engineer-based approaches for the heterologous production of ACEIp for antihypertensive therapy.

Peer review status:ACCEPTED

21 Jan 2020Submitted to Biotechnology and Bioengineering
22 Jan 2020Submission Checks Completed
22 Jan 2020Assigned to Editor
31 Jan 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
10 Mar 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
10 Mar 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Major
16 Apr 20201st Revision Received
17 Apr 2020Submission Checks Completed
17 Apr 2020Assigned to Editor
02 May 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
02 May 2020Editorial Decision: Accept