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Host plant genetic control of associated fungal and insect species in a Populus hybrid
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  • Sandra Simon,
  • Timothy Tschaplinski,
  • Jared Leboldus,
  • Ken Keefover-Ring,
  • Muhammad Azeem,
  • Jin-Gui Chen,
  • David Macaya-Sanz,
  • William MacDonald,
  • Wellington Muchero,
  • Gerald Tuskan,
  • Stephen DiFazio
Sandra Simon
West Virginia University
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Timothy Tschaplinski
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
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Jared Leboldus
Oregon State University
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Ken Keefover-Ring
University of Wisconsin Madison
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Muhammad Azeem
University of Wisconsin Madison
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Jin-Gui Chen
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
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David Macaya-Sanz
West Virginia University
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William MacDonald
West Virginia University
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Wellington Muchero
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
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Gerald Tuskan
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
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Stephen DiFazio
West Virginia University
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Abstract

Plants employ a diverse set of defense mechanisms to mediate interactions with insects and fungi. These relationships can leave lasting impacts on host plant genome structure such as rapid expansion of gene families through tandem duplication. These genomic signatures provide important clues about the complexities of plant/biotic stress interactions and evolution. We used a pseudo-backcross hybrid family to identify Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) controlling associations between Populus trees and several common Populus diseases and insects. Using whole genome sequences from each parent, we identified candidate genes that may mediate these interactions. Candidates were partially validated using mass spectrometry to identify corresponding QTL for defensive compounds. We detected significant QTL for two interacting fungal pathogens and three insects. The QTL intervals contained candidate genes potentially involved in physical and chemical mechanisms of host-plant resistance and susceptibility. In particular, we identified overlapping QTLs for a phenolic glycoside and Phyllocolpa sawfly abundance. There was also significant enrichment of recent tandem duplications in the genomic intervals of the native parent, but not the exotic parent. Tandem gene duplication may be an important mechanism for rapid response to biotic stressors, enabling trees with long juvenile periods to reach maturity despite many coevolving biotic stressors.

Peer review status:ACCEPTED

30 Jan 2020Submitted to Ecology and Evolution
31 Jan 2020Submission Checks Completed
31 Jan 2020Assigned to Editor
31 Jan 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
18 Feb 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
24 Feb 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Minor
05 Mar 20201st Revision Received
06 Mar 2020Submission Checks Completed
06 Mar 2020Assigned to Editor
06 Mar 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
08 Mar 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
23 Mar 2020Editorial Decision: Accept