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Response of soil characteristics and bacterial communities to a gradient of N fertilization rates for coastal salt-affected Fluvo-aquic soil under paddy rice-winter wheat rotation
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  • Rongjiang Yao,
  • Jingsong Yang,
  • Xiangping Wang,
  • Fule Zheng,
  • Wenping Xie,
  • Hongqiang Li,
  • cong Tang,
  • Hai Zhu
Rongjiang Yao
Institute of Soil Science Chinese Academy of Sciences
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Jingsong Yang
Institute of Soil Science Chinese Academy of Sciences
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Xiangping Wang
Institute of Soil Science Chinese Academy of Sciences
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Fule Zheng
University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences
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Wenping Xie
Institute of Soil Science Chinese Academy of Sciences
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Hongqiang Li
University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences
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cong Tang
University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences
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Hai Zhu
University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences
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Abstract

Excessive salts in soil inhibit enzyme activity, decrease microbial growth and constrain biochemical functioning, which could be alleviated by soil management and fertilization. However, the effect of consecutive chemical fertilizer on soil bacterial community structure under saline environment is poorly understood. Here, a field randomized block design under four nitrogen fertilization rates (0, 150, 300, and 450 kg N hm-2 y-1) was conducted on coastal salt-affected Fluvo-aquic soil. Effect of nitrogen fertilization rates on soil properties and bacterial community was characterized using Illumina Miseq sequencing for 16S rRNA gene. Results indicated that consecutive chemical N fertilization accelerated the improvement of soil chemical and microbial properties under the paddy rice - winter wheat rotation. Soil bacterial community well responded to the nitrogen fertilization and community richness and diversity increased with the nitrogen rates. Predominant bacterial phyla belonged to Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Planctomycetes, whereas Deltaproteobacteria, Anaerolineae, Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Planctomycetia were dominant bacterial classes. Increasing nitrogen fertilization resulted in an elevation in the relative abundance of classes Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Planctomycetia and Nitrospira, and a decline in Anaerolineae, Acidobacteria_Gp6, Cytophagia, Bacilli and Acidobacteria_Gp10. Clear separations in the bacterial communities at class level were observed under different nitrogen fertilization rates. Community structure of classes Alphaproteobacteria, Planctomycetia and Nitrospira was significantly influenced by potential nitrification rate (PNR), and community structure of class Actinobacteria was significantly influenced by carbon mineralization rate (CMR). The results demonstrated that nitrogen fertilization improved nutrients and metabolic activities to more suitable bacterial microhabitats for saline soil.

Peer review status:ACCEPTED

09 Feb 2020Submitted to Land Degradation & Development
11 Feb 2020Submission Checks Completed
11 Feb 2020Assigned to Editor
16 Feb 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
22 Mar 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
28 Mar 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Major
21 Apr 20201st Revision Received
21 Apr 2020Submission Checks Completed
21 Apr 2020Assigned to Editor
04 May 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
09 May 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Minor
11 May 20202nd Revision Received
11 May 2020Submission Checks Completed
11 May 2020Assigned to Editor
14 May 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
23 May 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Minor
25 May 20203rd Revision Received
25 May 2020Submission Checks Completed
25 May 2020Assigned to Editor
06 Jun 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
13 Jun 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Minor
15 Jun 20204th Revision Received
15 Jun 2020Submission Checks Completed
15 Jun 2020Assigned to Editor
25 Jun 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
26 Jun 2020Editorial Decision: Accept