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Ripening transition and storage environmental impact on sucrose accumulation and associated responsive genes in strawberries
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  • Ivan Del Olmo,
  • Maria Blanch,
  • IRENE ROMERO,
  • Maria Vazquez-Hernandez,
  • Maria Teresa Sanchez-Ballesta,
  • Maria I. Escribano,
  • Carmen Merodio
Ivan Del Olmo
Institute of Science and Technology Food and Nutrition Biotechnology and Postharvest QualityGroup
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Maria Blanch
Institute of Science and Technology Food and Nutrition Biotechnology and Postharvest QualityGroup
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IRENE ROMERO
Institute of Science and Technology Food and Nutrition Biotechnology and Postharvest QualityGroup
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Maria Vazquez-Hernandez
Institute of Science and Technology Food and Nutrition Biotechnology and Postharvest QualityGroup
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Maria Teresa Sanchez-Ballesta
Institute of Science and Technology Food and Nutrition Biotechnology and Postharvest QualityGroup
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Maria I. Escribano
Institute of Science and Technology Food and Nutrition Biotechnology and Postharvest QualityGroup
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Carmen Merodio
Institute of Science and Technology Food and Nutrition Biotechnology and Postharvest QualityGroup
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Abstract

To obtain the best taste of woodland strawberries (Fragaria vesca) at the moment of consumption, it is essential to analyse the dynamics of sugar accumulation during ripening transition stages and explore how to control sucrose reserves after harvest. For this purpose, we analysed the accumulation of major sugars, sucrose-related olygomers and the expression of homologues genes involved in sucrose metabolism in attached strawberries at different ripening stages and after harvest. Measurements were taken during early and late phases of low temperature storage (LT) with and without CO2 pretreatment and further shelf-life at 20 ºC (SL). Our results show an increase in major sugars and sucrose in dark red (DR) strawberries associated with up-regulation of FvSPS1 and down-regulation of FvVINV2. The CO2-treated fruit showed high levels of sucrose, an FvSS1 up-regulation together with a modulation of homologues of FvVINV. Moreover, fruit treated with CO2 during SL (LTC) revealed a reduction in FvVINV homologue expression maintaining the sucrose reserves. High amounts in fructose and myo-inositol at LTC were observed, following a similar trend to that found in DR strawberries. We suggest that CO2 pre-treatment promotes a carbohydrate conserving state which has important implications for reducing weight loss and preserving sweetness.