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Translocation of 11C-labelled photosynthates to fruits depends on leaf transpiration
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  • Yuta Miyoshi,
  • Jens Mincke,
  • Jonathan Vermeiren,
  • Jan Courtyn,
  • Christian Vanhove,
  • Stefaan Vandenberghe,
  • Naoki Kawachi,
  • Kathy Steppe
Yuta Miyoshi
National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute
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Jens Mincke
Ghent University Faculty of Bioscience Engineering
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Jonathan Vermeiren
Ghent University Faculty of Bioscience Engineering
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Jan Courtyn
University Hospital Ghent
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Christian Vanhove
Ghent University Faculty of Engineering and Architecture
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Stefaan Vandenberghe
Ghent University Faculty of Engineering and Architecture
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Naoki Kawachi
National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute
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Kathy Steppe
Ghent University Faculty of Bioscience Engineering
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Abstract

Photosynthate translocation from leaves to fruits is an important determinant of crop yield and quality. In protected cultivation, environmental control based on photosynthate translocation is indicative for realising high-yield and high-quality production. However, there are few studies on the environmental response of photosynthate translocation. In this study, we focused on light intensity as a key environmental factor to steer translocation. We fed 11CO2 to a leaf of strawberry plant (Fragaria × ananassa Duch.) and analysed real-time dynamics in 11C-labeled photosynthate translocation from a 11CO2-fed leaf to individual fruits on an inflorescence of intact plants by using positron emission tomography (PET) under different light intensities (50, 100, 200 and 400 μmol m-2 s-1). A poor relationship was obtained between 11C-photosynthate translocation and light intensity according to the results that 11C-photosynthate translocation rates into the fruits was highest under the light intensity of 100 μmol m-2 s-1 followed by those of 200, 400 and 50 μmol m-2 s-1. On the other hand, there was a strong negative correlation between transpiration rate of the 11C-fed leaf and 11C-photosynthate translocation rate. These novel findings indicate that transpiration, which controls the leaf moisture status, is one of the main drivers for photosynthate translocation towards fruits.