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Combined genomic and transcriptomic analysis of Dibutyl phthalate metabolic pathway in Arthrobacter sp. ZJUTW
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  • Tengfei Liu,
  • Jun Li,
  • Lequn Qiu,
  • Fuming Zhang,
  • Robert Linhardt,
  • Weihong Zhong
Tengfei Liu
Zhejiang University of Technology
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Jun Li
Zhejiang University of Technology
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Lequn Qiu
Zhejiang University of Technology
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Fuming Zhang
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
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Robert Linhardt
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
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Weihong Zhong
Zhejiang University of Technology
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Abstract

Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) is an environmental pollutant that can threaten human health. The strain Arthrobacter sp. ZJUTW, isolated from the sludge of river of Hangzhou city, can efficiently degrade DBP. Its genomic and transcriptomic differences when cultivated with DBP and with glucose revealed specific DBP metabolic pathways in the ZJUTW strain. The degrading gene clusters distribute separately on a circular chromosome and a plasmid pQL1. Genes related to the initial steps of DBP degradation from DBP to phthalic acid (PA), the pehA gene and pht gene cluster, are located on the plasmid pQL1. While pca gene cluster related to the transforming of protocatechuic acid (PCA) to acetyl-CoA, is located on the chromosome. After homologous alignment analysis with the reported gene clusters, we found that there were a series of double copies of homologous genes in pht and pca gene clusters that contribute to the efficient degradation of DBP by ZJUTW. In addition, transcriptomic analysis showed a synergistic effect between pht and pca clusters, which also favor ZJUTW allowing it to efficiently degrade DBP. Combined genomic and transcriptomic analyses affords the complete DBP metabolic pathway in Arthrobacter sp. ZJUTW that is different from that of reported other Arthrobacter strains. After necessary modification based on its metabolic characteristics, Arthrobacter sp. ZJUTW or its mutants might represent promising candidates for use in the bioremediation of DBP pollution.

Peer review status:ACCEPTED

22 Mar 2020Submitted to Biotechnology and Bioengineering
22 Mar 2020Submission Checks Completed
22 Mar 2020Assigned to Editor
23 Apr 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
04 Jun 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Major
04 Jun 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
20 Jul 20201st Revision Received
20 Jul 2020Submission Checks Completed
20 Jul 2020Assigned to Editor
23 Jul 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
23 Jul 2020Editorial Decision: Accept