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Predicting the risk of recurrent venous thrombosis: Impact and therapeutic consequences of inherited thrombophilia
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  • Hela Baccouche,
  • Maroua Belhadj,
  • Fatma Said,
  • Ines Naceur,
  • Mohamed Habib Houman,
  • Neila Ben Romdhane
Hela Baccouche
La Rabta Hospital
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Maroua Belhadj
La Rabta Hospital
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Fatma Said
La Rabta Hospital
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Ines Naceur
La Rabta Hospital
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Mohamed Habib Houman
La Rabta Hospital
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Neila Ben Romdhane
La Rabta Hospital
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Abstract

Rationale, aims and objectives :Over the past decades, thrombophilia testing in patients with venous thrombo-embolism (VTE) has increased tremendously. However, the role of inherited thrombophilia (IT) in prediction the risk of recurrence remains controversial. Consequently, it is still unclear whether thrombophilia testing influences decisions regarding duration of anticoagulation in clinical practices. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact if IT on VTE treatment decisions and on predicting the risk of recurrence. Methods : A retrospective longitudinal study (January 2011-Decembre 2016) including 190 patients with confirmed VTE referred from internal medicine department for inherited thrombophilia screening was carried out. Results : The mean age patients was 40.2 years and the sex ratio (M/F) was 0.78. IT was confirmed in 27.5% of patients. A long term anticoagulation was decided in 51.6% of patients with IT. There was no significant difference in the duration of anticoagulation between patients with or without IT. VTE recurrence was recorded in 26 (13.7 %) patients. The 24 years cumulative incidence of recurrence was 9% in patients with IT and 14% in those without. IT was not associated with increased risk of recurrence after treatment withdrawal (Hazard ratio=1.31 IC(0.47-3.63); p=0.6). Conclusion : In clinical practice, IT did not influence anticoagulation duration and was not associated with a higher VTE risk of recurrence. It seems to be less relevant for decision making than presumed.