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Improving Resident Satisfaction with Post-Hospitalization Follow-up at Mayo Clinic Florida
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  • Megan Melody,
  • Samantha Espinosa,
  • Karl Mareth,
  • Lindsay Gardner,
  • Alexander Heckman,
  • Annamaria Mechtler,
  • SeQuoya Killebrew,
  • Matthew Dudgeon,
  • Richard White,
  • Leigh Speicher
Megan Melody
Mayo Clinic Florida
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Samantha Espinosa
Mayo Clinic Florida
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Karl Mareth
Mayo Clinic Florida
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Lindsay Gardner
Mayo Clinic Florida
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Alexander Heckman
Mayo Clinic Florida
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Annamaria Mechtler
Mayo Clinic Florida
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SeQuoya Killebrew
Mayo Clinic Florida
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Matthew Dudgeon
Mayo Clinic Florida
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Richard White
Mayo Clinic Florida
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Leigh Speicher
Mayo Clinic Florida
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Abstract

Rationale, aims, and objectives: Post-hospitalization follow-up within 30 days following discharge has been shown to positively impact time to readmission, healthcare costs, and patient self-reported adherence and satisfaction. We aimed to improve resident satisfaction with the process of establishing post-hospitalization, primary care provider (PCP) follow-up. Methods: In this quality improvement study we surveyed all internal medicine residents at our institution regarding their satisfaction with the process of establishing PCP follow-up at the time of hospital discharge. A streamlined process was developed and two subsequent interventions were enacted; a dedicated teaching session and distribution of pocket cards outlining the process. Residents were then surveyed following each intervention to assess for impact on overall satisfaction and burden of work. Results: Initially, 77.3% of residents were not satisfied with the process of establishing post-hospitalization PCP follow-up. Following the first intervention there was a trend towards increasing satisfaction rates by 16.7% (p= 0.20), and after the second intervention there was a statistically significant increase in satisfaction rates from baseline by 44% (p= 0.007). There was also a reduction in the feeling of workload burden associated with establishing PCP follow-up from 32% to 25%, and over 67% of participants either agreed or strongly agreed that the workload was not too burdensome. Conclusion: This quality improvement initiative established that resident physicians at our institution previously found the process of establishing PCP follow-up at the time of patient discharge both confusing and burdensome. Through the implementation of our interventions we were able to achieve our aims of improving resident satisfaction.

Peer review status:POSTED

06 May 2020Submitted to Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice
09 May 2020Assigned to Editor
09 May 2020Submission Checks Completed