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Domestic dog origin of Carnivore Protoparvovirus 1 infection in a rescued free-ranging guiña (Leopardus guigna)
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  • Rene Ortega,
  • Juan Mena Vasquez,
  • Sofía Grecco,
  • Ruben Pérez,
  • Yanina Panzera,
  • Constanza Napolitano,
  • Nhur-Aischa Zegpi,
  • Alberto Sandoval,
  • Daniel Sandoval,
  • Daniel González-Acuña,
  • Sergio Cofré,
  • victor Neira Ramirez,
  • Cristobal Castillo-Aliaga
Rene Ortega
Universidad de Concepcion
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Juan Mena Vasquez
Universidad de Chile
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Sofía Grecco
Universidad de la República Uruguay
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Ruben Pérez
Universidad de la República Uruguay
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Yanina Panzera
Universidad de la República Uruguay
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Constanza Napolitano
Universidad de Los Lagos
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Nhur-Aischa Zegpi
Universidad de Concepcion
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Alberto Sandoval
Universidad de Concepcion
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Daniel Sandoval
Universidad de Concepcion
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Daniel González-Acuña
Universidad de Concepción
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Sergio Cofré
Universidad de Concepcion
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victor Neira Ramirez
Universidad de Chile
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Cristobal Castillo-Aliaga
University of Concepción
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Abstract

Carnivore protoparvovirus 1 is one of the most important pathogens affecting both wild and domestic carnivores. Here, we reported the genetic characterization of canine parvovirus strains from a rescued guiña (Leopardus guigna) and domestic dogs from Chile. Guiña sequence was classified as CPV-2c and phylogenetic analysis of the complete coding genome showed that the guiña CPV-2c strain share a recent common ancestor with Chilean domestic dogs strains. These viruses presented >99% identity and showed three changes in the NS1 protein, CHL-17 V596A, CHL-71 E661K and CHL-guigna L582F. This is the first detection and genetic characterization of CPV-2c infection in guiña worldwide and one of the few comparative studies that undoubtedly determine that the source of infection were domestic dogs. The current findings highlight that guiña is a susceptible species to protoparvovirus infection and that domestic dogs represent an important thread to its conservation. The CPV cross-species transmission between domestic dogs and guiña should be taken into account for protection programs of this endangerous species.

Peer review status:ACCEPTED

20 May 2020Submitted to Transboundary and Emerging Diseases
22 May 2020Submission Checks Completed
22 May 2020Assigned to Editor
30 May 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
14 Jun 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
15 Jun 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Major
08 Jul 20201st Revision Received
09 Jul 2020Submission Checks Completed
09 Jul 2020Assigned to Editor
11 Jul 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
25 Jul 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
25 Jul 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Minor
04 Aug 20202nd Revision Received
04 Aug 2020Submission Checks Completed
04 Aug 2020Assigned to Editor
04 Aug 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
13 Aug 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
13 Aug 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Minor
16 Aug 20203rd Revision Received
17 Aug 2020Submission Checks Completed
17 Aug 2020Assigned to Editor
17 Aug 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
17 Aug 2020Editorial Decision: Accept