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St George's COVID shield for use by ENT surgeons performing tracheostomies
  • +3
  • Sabrina Brar,
  • Jahan Daya,
  • James Schuster-Bruce,
  • Sanjeev Krishna,
  • Darren Lui,
  • Hamid Daya
Sabrina Brar
St George's University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
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Jahan Daya
University of Bath Department of Mechanical Engineering
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James Schuster-Bruce
St George's University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
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Sanjeev Krishna
St George's University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
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Darren Lui
St George's University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
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Hamid Daya
St. George's University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
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Abstract

Objectives To investigate the ability of a physical barrier to reduce aerosol particle spread during a simulated aerosol generating procedure. Design A simulated aerosol generating procedure. Setting Standard hospital ward, St George’s Hospital, London. Participant One volunteer participant - they were healthy, asymptomatic, and a non-smoker. Main Outcome Measures 1. To compare the effect of the shield on particle frequency (according to particle size) at different locations. 2. To evaluate the length of time that particles remained within the shield, both with and without an aspiration unit. Results Clinical investigations using the shield demonstrated a twelve-fold decrease in the number of particles detected at the position of the operating surgeon when the shield was used (particle size 0.3μm; with shield 8662 versus 103800 without shield). Over a 7-minute period, there was a reduction in the number of particles. At 7 minutes, the total number of particles (size 0.3μm) measured within the shield was comparable to the particle frequency at ambient levels (8752 within the shield compared with 8592 within the ambient environment). The aspiration unit reduced the number of particles detected within the shield over time. An average of 9649 particles (similar to ambient level) sized 0.3μm were measured under the shield after 2 minutes when the aspiration unit was used. Conclusion The clinical simulation illustrates a significant decrease in the number of particles detected at varying locations when the shield is used. The shield, used with appropriate PPE, could help to minimise exposure to aerosol-generated particles such as during tracheostomies on patients with COVID-19.

Peer review status:IN REVISION

17 May 2020Submitted to Clinical Otolaryngology
28 May 2020Assigned to Editor
28 May 2020Submission Checks Completed
02 Jun 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
24 Jun 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
28 Jun 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Major