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Spotted fever group Rickettsiae in Dermacentor marginatus from wild boars in Italy
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  • Giovanni Sgroi,
  • Roberta Iatta,
  • Riccardo Lia,
  • Nicola D'Alessio,
  • Ranju Manoj,
  • Vincenzo Veneziano,
  • Domenico Otranto
Giovanni Sgroi
University of Bari
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Roberta Iatta
University of Bari
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Riccardo Lia
University of Bari
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Nicola D'Alessio
Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Mezzogiorno
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Ranju Manoj
University of Bari
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Vincenzo Veneziano
University of Naples Federico II
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Domenico Otranto
University of Bari
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Abstract

Following the increase in wild boar population recorded in urban and peri-urban areas through Europe, the present survey aimed to assess the occurrence of zoonotic tick-borne bacteria in animals and their ticks collected from southern Italy, in order to evaluate the potential risk of infection for animals and humans. From October to December 2019, a total of 176 ticks collected from 93 wild boars and their spleen samples were molecularly screened for Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex, Coxiella burnetii and spotted fever group (SFG) Rickettsia species. Overall, all the wild boars were infested by ticks (mean intensity, 1.9) with Dermacentor marginatus and Ixodes ricinus being identified in 99.4% and 0.6%, respectively. Out of 93 wild boars, 17 (18.3%) were infested by ticks positive to spotted fever group (SFG) Rickettsia species. Rickettsia slovaca and Rickettsia raoultii were identified in 16 (9%) and 1 (0.6%) D. marginatus, respectively, whereas a single I. ricinus (0.6%) was infected by R. slovaca. A single wild boar (1.1%) scored positive to R. slovaca. All ticks and wild boars scored negative to C. burnetii and B. burgdorferi s.l. complex. Data herein obtained suggest wild boars are involved in the dissemination of D. marginatus, especially in peri-urban settlements of the study area. An integrated management approach is advocated for wild boar population control and preventing the potential risk of tick-borne bacteria in animals and humans.

Peer review status:Published

22 Jun 2020Submitted to Transboundary and Emerging Diseases
23 Jun 2020Submission Checks Completed
23 Jun 2020Assigned to Editor
25 Jun 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
21 Jul 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
21 Jul 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Major
11 Sep 20201st Revision Received
12 Sep 2020Assigned to Editor
12 Sep 2020Submission Checks Completed
12 Sep 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
15 Sep 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
15 Sep 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Minor
18 Sep 20202nd Revision Received
19 Sep 2020Submission Checks Completed
19 Sep 2020Assigned to Editor
19 Sep 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
21 Sep 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
21 Sep 2020Editorial Decision: Accept
28 Sep 2020Published in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases. 10.1111/tbed.13859