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Association between anthropometric characteristics and bladder cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal cohort studies
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  • Lazaros Tzelves,
  • Dimitra Xenou,
  • Andreas Skolarikos,
  • Ioannis Varkarakis,
  • Charalampos Deliveliotis,
  • Evangelos Terpos,
  • Kimon Stamatelopoulos,
  • Theodoros Sergentanis,
  • Theodora Psaltopoulou
Lazaros Tzelves
Geniko Nosokomeio Attikes Sismanogleio Amalia Phlemink
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Dimitra Xenou
National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
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Andreas Skolarikos
Geniko Nosokomeio Attikes Sismanogleio Amalia Phlemink
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Ioannis Varkarakis
Geniko Nosokomeio Attikes Sismanogleio Amalia Phlemink
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Charalampos Deliveliotis
Geniko Nosokomeio Attikes Sismanogleio Amalia Phlemink
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Evangelos Terpos
National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
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Kimon Stamatelopoulos
National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
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Theodoros Sergentanis
National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
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Theodora Psaltopoulou
National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
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Abstract

Background/ Aims Anthropometric characteristics, namely overweight/obesity, height and waist circumference have been associated with various cancer types. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to evaluate the potential associations between anthropometric characteristics and bladder cancer risk, synthesizing longitudinal cohort studies. Methods Literature search across MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, Google Scholar and Cochrane Central was performed up to December 31, 2019 and data abstraction was performed independently by two authors. Random-effects (DerSimonian-Laird) models were used to estimate pooled relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI); subgroup analyses were performed geographical region, mean age, publication year, length of follow-up, sample size, method of BMI estimation and adjustment for smoking. Results A total of 27 studies were included (88,593 bladder cancer cases in a total cohort of 49,647,098 subjects). Increased bladder cancer risk was noted in overweight men (pooled RR=1.12, 95%CI: 1.04-1.21) but not in overweight women. Both obese men (pooled RR=1.14, 95%CI: 1.06-1.22) and women (pooled RR=1.19, 95%CI: 1.02-1.38) showed increased risk. Interestingly, height increase per 5 cm did not seem to affect risk of bladder cancer in men (pooled RR=1.03, 95%CI: 0.99- 1.06) and women (pooled RR=1.02, 95%CI: 0.97-1.06). Larger waist circumference was associated with bladder cancer risk in men (pooled RR=1.18, 95%CI: 1.09-1.26) but not women. Conclusion In conclusion, bladder cancer risk seems to be related with obesity overall and central obesity in men. In contrast to other cancer types, height does not seem to affect risk, but more studies are needed to extract safe conclusions.

Peer review status:UNDER REVIEW

11 Jul 2020Submitted to International Journal of Clinical Practice
13 Jul 2020Assigned to Editor
13 Jul 2020Submission Checks Completed
23 Jul 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned