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Role of a pharmacist in the safe self-medication -- A questionnaire-based survey
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  • Selma Škrbo,
  • Semir Mehović,
  • Naida Omerović,
  • Anela Hadžifejzović-Trnka,
  • Nermina Žiga-Smajić,
  • Belma Pehlivanović,
  • Dina Lagumdžija
Selma Škrbo
University of Sarajevo
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Semir Mehović
University of Sarajevo
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Naida Omerović
University of Sarajevo
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Anela Hadžifejzović-Trnka
Amsal Pharmaceuticals d.o.o.
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Nermina Žiga-Smajić
University of Sarajevo
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Belma Pehlivanović
University of Sarajevo
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Dina Lagumdžija
University of Sarajevo
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Abstract

Introduction: Self-medication has been very popular and globally prevalent for a long time. Aim: This research aims to present pharmacists’ engagement in the process of self-medication in the Sarajevo Canton. Methods: A total of 312 respondents completed an anonymous questionnaire-based survey. The first group (165 respondents) was surveyed in the pharmacy after buying a non-prescription drug, and the second group (147 respondents) outside the pharmacy. Results: The most commonly purchased drug was paracetamol, whereas headache was dominant amongst health conditions for which treatment respondents intended to use the purchased drug. A belief that respondents could cure themselves was the most common answer when asked why they had not visited a doctor, whereas previous experience with the purchased drug prevailed as an answer when asked from whom they had gotten information about the adequacy of the purchased drug for their health problem. Respondents mostly bought drugs for themselves. Pharmacists instructed 65% of respondents on how to take the purchased drug and checked whether 55% of respondents bought an appropriate drug for their health problem. Only 25% and 29% of respondents were informed about the adverse effects and potential contraindications or interactions of the purchased drug, respectively. According to 45% of respondents, pharmacists spent up to one minute in a conversation with them about the purchased drug. Conclusion: In the Sarajevo Canton, pharmacists should be more actively involved in the process of self-medication and provide the necessary advice to patients consuming non-prescription drugs. Further research is needed to create a clearer picture.

Peer review status:UNDER REVIEW

30 Jul 2020Submitted to International Journal of Clinical Practice
01 Aug 2020Assigned to Editor
01 Aug 2020Submission Checks Completed
22 Sep 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned