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Implications of CD39 in immune-related diseases
  • +14
  • Jianrui Zeng,
  • Zhaochen Ning,
  • Hui Zhang,
  • Guanjun Dong,
  • Junfeng Zhang,
  • Hui Shi,
  • Fenglian Yan,
  • Mingsheng Zhao,
  • Changying Wang,
  • Qun Ma,
  • Jun Dai,
  • Zhihua Li,
  • Chunxia Li,
  • Haiyan Wang,
  • Dalei Cheng,
  • Yuzhong Wang,
  • Huabao Xiong
Jianrui Zeng
Jining Medical University
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Zhaochen Ning
Jining Medical University
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Hui Zhang
Jining Medical University
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Guanjun Dong
Jining Medical University
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Junfeng Zhang
Jining Medical University
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Hui Shi
Jining Medical University
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Fenglian Yan
Jining Medical University
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Mingsheng Zhao
Jining Medical University
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Changying Wang
Jining Medical University
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Qun Ma
Jining Medical University
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Jun Dai
Jining Medical University
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Zhihua Li
Jining Medical University
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Chunxia Li
Jining Medical University
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Haiyan Wang
Jining Medical University
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Dalei Cheng
Jining Medical University
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Yuzhong Wang
Affiliated Hospital of Jining Medical University
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Huabao Xiong
Jining Medical University
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Abstract

Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (eATP) mediates pro-inflammatory responses by recruiting and activating inflammatory cells. eATP is hydrolyzed by CD39 to adenosine monophosphate (AMP), which is converted to the immunosuppressive nucleoside adenosine (ADO) by CD73. CD39 is the rate-limiting enzyme in this cascade and can be viewed as an immunological switch that shifts ATP-driven pro-inflammatory immune cell activity to an anti-inflammatory state mediated by ADO. CD39 is expressed by a broad range of immune cells and can be influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Accumulating evidence suggests that CD39 is involved in several pathophysiological events, such as inflammatory bowel diseases, sepsis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, allergic diseases, systemic lupus erythematosus, diabetes, and cancer. Here, we focus on the current understanding of CD39 in immunity, and presents a comprehensive picture of the multiple roles of CD39 in a variety of disorders.