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Maternal sleep duration and neonatal birth weight: The Japan Environment and Children’s Study
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  • Tsuyoshi Murata,
  • Hyo Kyozuka,
  • Toma Fukuda,
  • Shun Yasuda,
  • Akiko Yamaguchi,
  • Seiichi Morokuma,
  • Akiko Sato,
  • Yuka Ogata,
  • Kosei Shinoki,
  • Mitsuaki Hosoya,
  • Seiji Yasumura,
  • Koichi Hashimoto,
  • Hidekazu Nishigori,
  • Keiya Fujimori
Tsuyoshi Murata
Fukushima Medical University
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Hyo Kyozuka
Fukushima Medical University
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Toma Fukuda
Fukushima Medical University
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Shun Yasuda
Fukushima Medical University
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Akiko Yamaguchi
Fukushima Medical University
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Seiichi Morokuma
Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University
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Akiko Sato
Fukushima Medical University
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Yuka Ogata
Fukushima Medical University
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Kosei Shinoki
Fukushima Medical University
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Mitsuaki Hosoya
Fukushima Medical University
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Seiji Yasumura
Fukushima Medical University
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Koichi Hashimoto
Fukushima Medical University
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Hidekazu Nishigori
Fukushima Medical University
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Keiya Fujimori
Fukushima Medical University
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Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the effect of maternal sleep duration (MSD) on low birth weight infants (LBW), small for gestational age infants (SGA), and macrosomia. Design: Prospective cohort study Setting: The Japan Environment and Children’s Study (JECS) Population: Participants enrolled in JECS, with singleton pregnancies after 22 weeks, who gave birth between 2011 and 2014. Methods: Participants were categorized into five groups according to MSD during pregnancy: G1 (MSD <6.0 h), G2 (6.0–7.9 h), G3 (8.0–8.9 h), G4 (9.0–9.9 h), and G5 (10.0–12.0 h). Main outcome measures: The effect of MSD on the risk of LBW (<2,500 g and <1,500 g), SGA, and macrosomia (>4,000 g) with G2 as the reference, while adjusting for gestational excessive body weight gain (BWG). Analysis was also performed after stratification by gestational BWG. Results: We analyzed 82,171 participants. The adjusted odds ratios (aORs) of LBW <2,500 g in G4 and G5 and of SGA in G4 were 0.90 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-0.99), 0.86 (95% CI, 0.76-0.99), and 0.91 (95% CI, 0.82-0.99), respectively, before adjusting for excessive gestational BWG. No significant association was observed between MSD and these outcomes after adjusting for excessive gestational BWG. Among women with appropriate gestational BWG, the aORs of LBW <2,500 g and SGA in G4 were 0.88 (95% CI, 0.80-0.97) and 0.87 (95% CI, 0.78-0.97), respectively. Conclusion: This study revealed that 9.0–9.9 h of MSD significantly decreased LBW <2,500 g and SGA in pregnant women with appropriate gestational BWG, relative to 6.0–7.9 h of MSD.

Peer review status:UNDER REVIEW

17 Aug 2020Submitted to BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
17 Aug 2020Assigned to Editor
17 Aug 2020Submission Checks Completed
22 Aug 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
21 Sep 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending