loading page

Variability of structural and functional traits of vascular tissues in tomato: modeling, histology and flow-MRI investigations
  • +7
  • Jeanne Simon,
  • Maïda Cardoso,
  • Béatrice Brunel,
  • Eric Alibert,
  • Christelle Baptiste,
  • Marc Lartaud,
  • Jean-Luc Verdeil,
  • Gilles Vercambre,
  • Christophe Goze-Bac,
  • Nadia Bertin
Jeanne Simon
INRAE
Author Profile
Maïda Cardoso
Université de Montpellier
Author Profile
Béatrice Brunel
INRAE
Author Profile
Eric Alibert
Université de Montpellier
Author Profile
Christelle Baptiste
CIRAD Centre de Montpellier
Author Profile
Marc Lartaud
CIRAD Centre de Montpellier
Author Profile
Jean-Luc Verdeil
CIRAD Centre de Montpellier
Author Profile
Gilles Vercambre
INRAE
Author Profile
Christophe Goze-Bac
Université de Montpellier
Author Profile
Nadia Bertin
INRAE, INRAE
Author Profile

Abstract

Vascular tissues are main routes of resource transport, which are crucial for the growth of fleshy fruit. Very few quantitative data of the total and active areas of xylem and phloem are available for herbaceous plants and their variabilities are unknown. In this study, histological approach and process-based modeling of tomato fruit growth were combined to evaluate the potential contribution of the pedicel anatomy to fruit mass variations. Eleven genotypes were described and the impact of water deficit was studied depending on stress intensity and stage of application. In parallel, MRI experiments allowed to better understand the source of variability in xylem flow along the main stem. Our results suggested that the genetic and water deficit-induced variations in the areas of vascular tissues in the pedicel partly contributed to fruit mass variability. Flow-MRI appeared to be a complementary non-destructive method to phenotype vascular tissues. Whereas the flow velocity in active xylem vessels was rather stable along the main stem, the decrease in the number of active vessels strongly reduces the effective flow from the bottom to the top of the plant. Fruitful interactions between modeling, histology and flow-MRI are promising and worth exploring, to predict water fluxes within plant architecture.

Peer review status:UNDER REVIEW

27 Aug 2020Submitted to Plant, Cell & Environment
28 Aug 2020Assigned to Editor
28 Aug 2020Submission Checks Completed
03 Sep 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned