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Resistance-based connectivity model to construct corridors of Przewalski's gazelle in fragmented landscape
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  • Jingjie Zhang,
  • Feng Jiang,
  • Zhenyuan Cai,
  • Yunchuan Dai,
  • Daoxin Liu,
  • Pengfei Song,
  • Yuansheng Hou,
  • Hongmei Gao,
  • Tongzuo Zhang
Jingjie Zhang
Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology Chinese Academy of Sciences
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Feng Jiang
Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology Chinese Academy of Sciences
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Zhenyuan Cai
Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology Chinese Academy of Sciences
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Yunchuan Dai
Chinese Academy of Forestry
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Daoxin Liu
Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology Chinese Academy of Sciences
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Pengfei Song
Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology Chinese Academy of Sciences
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Yuansheng Hou
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Hongmei Gao
Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology Chinese Academy of Sciences
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Tongzuo Zhang
Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology Chinese Academy of Sciences
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Abstract

Habitat connectivity is indispensable for the survival of species that occupy a small habitat area and have isolated habitat patches from each other. At present, the development of human economy not only squeezes the living space of wild animals, but also strongly interferes and hinders the migration of species. Therefore, we need to enhance the habitat connectivity of species in broken habitats, which would facilitate the proliferation of species, enhance gene exchange between populations and improve the ability of species to respond to environmental changes. Przewalski's gazelle, as one of the world's most endangered ungulate mammals, has historically experienced a significant reduction in population and severe habitat shrinkage. At present, even though the population of this species has recovered to a certain extent, humans Infrastructure severely hindered the gene flow between several patches of this species. Therefore, we used habitat suitability index model combined with Przewalski's gazelle movement characteristics to establish 11 habitat patches, and used the least cost path and circuit theory based on resistance model to jointly simulate the landscape network pattern of this species. In addition, we also analyzed and selected important patches and key migration paths as important references for establishing corridors. Overall, our research aims to provide habitat networks and maintain landscape connectivity to achieve the fundamental goal of protecting and revitalizing Przewalski's gazelle populations.

Peer review status:UNDER REVIEW

30 Aug 2020Submitted to Ecology and Evolution
31 Aug 2020Assigned to Editor
31 Aug 2020Submission Checks Completed
01 Sep 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned