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Long-term Prognosis of Short QT Interval in Asian Patients: Multicenter Retrospective Cohort Study
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  • Dae-Young Kim,
  • Jae-Sun Uhm,
  • Min Kim,
  • In-Soo Kim,
  • Moo-Nyun Jin,
  • Hee Tae Yu,
  • Tae-Hoon Kim,
  • Jong Youn Kim,
  • Boyoung Joung,
  • Hui-Nam Pak,
  • Moon-Hyoung Lee
Dae-Young Kim
Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine
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Jae-Sun Uhm
Yonsei University Health System
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Min Kim
Yonsei University Health System
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In-Soo Kim
Yonsei University Health System
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Moo-Nyun Jin
Severance Hospital
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Hee Tae Yu
Yonsei University Health System
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Tae-Hoon Kim
Yonsei University Health System
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Jong Youn Kim
Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine
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Boyoung Joung
Yonsei Cardiovascular Center and Cardiovascular Research
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Hui-Nam Pak
Yonsei University Health System
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Moon-Hyoung Lee
Yonsei Cardiovascular Center and Cardiovascular Research
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Abstract

Introduction: Short QT syndrome is a rare, inherited channelopathy associated with sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) but characteristics and prognosis of short QT interval (SQTI) in Asian patients remain unclear. This study aimed to determine clinical characteristics of and outcomes in patients with SQTI in an Asian population. Methods: Consecutive patients with SQTI were recruited. SQTI was defined as a Bazett’s formula-corrected QT interval (QTc) ≤340 ms in serial electrocardiograms. Age- and sex-matched patients with a normal QTc and without overt cardiovascular disease were included at a 1:4 ratio. Clinical and ECG features and outcomes were compared between patients with and without SQTI. Results: Thirty-four patients with SQTI [age, 23.5 (21–30.5) years; 31 male] were followed up for 4.8 (2.0–7.8) years. Early repolarization, tall T wave, and U wave were significantly more frequent in patients with SQTI than the patients without SQTI. QT dispersion [44.0 (28.0–73.0) vs. 20.0 (12.0–35.0) ms, P<0.001] was significantly wider and heart rate [52.0 (47.0–58.0) vs. 70.0 (62.3–84.0) /min, P<0.001] was significantly slower in patients with SQTI than patients without SQTI. Atrial fibrillation (AF, 11.8% vs. 2.2%, P=0.030) and ventricular arrhythmia (VA)/SCA (8.7% vs 0%, P=0.007) were significantly more frequent in patients with SQTI than patients without SQTI. SQTI was significantly associated with AF [odds ratio, 5.911; 95% confidence interval, 1.257–27.808; P=0.025] and VA/SCA. Conclusions: In this Asian population, SQTI was associated with AF and VA/SCA.