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Heart failure is not a determinant of central apnea index in the pediatric population
  • +2
  • Jonathan Wheeler,
  • Kaylee Tutrow,
  • Eric Ebenroth,
  • Benjamin Gaston,
  • Anuja Bandyopadhyay
Jonathan Wheeler
Indiana University School of Medicine
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Kaylee Tutrow
Indiana University School of Medicine
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Eric Ebenroth
Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health
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Benjamin Gaston
Riley
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Anuja Bandyopadhyay
Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health
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Abstract

Background/Objectives: Adults with heart failure (HF) have high prevalence of central sleep apnea (CSA). While this has been repeatedly investigated in adults, there is a deficiency of similar research in the pediatric population. The goal of this study was to compare prevalence of CSA in children with and without HF and correlate central apnea events with heart function. Methods: Retrospective analysis of data from children with and without HF was conducted. Eligible children were <18 years old with echocardiogram and polysomnogram within 6 months of each other. Children were separated into groups with and without HF and groups with and without elevated central apnea index (CAI) for comparative study. Results: 120 children (+HF:19, -HF:101) were included. The +HF group was younger, with higher prevalence of trisomy 21, muscular dystrophy, oromotor incoordination, and structural heart disease and lower Apnea Hypopnea Index and lower CAI. Prevalence of CSA was similar in both the groups. LogCAI was inversely correlated to age at time of sleep study. Children with elevated CAI were younger and had higher prevalence of prematurity. There was no difference in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) between groups with and without elevated CAI. Conclusion: In contrast to adults, after adjusting for age, there is no difference in frequency of central apneic events in children with and without heart failure. Unlike in adults, LVEF does not correlate with CAI in children. Overall, it appears that CAI may be more a function of age rather than of heart function in the pediatric population.

Peer review status:ACCEPTED

02 Sep 2020Submitted to Pediatric Pulmonology
03 Sep 2020Submission Checks Completed
03 Sep 2020Assigned to Editor
03 Sep 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
24 Sep 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
30 Sep 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Major
19 Oct 20201st Revision Received
21 Oct 2020Assigned to Editor
21 Oct 2020Submission Checks Completed
21 Oct 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
02 Nov 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
04 Nov 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Minor
20 Nov 20202nd Revision Received
23 Nov 2020Submission Checks Completed
23 Nov 2020Assigned to Editor
23 Nov 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
10 Dec 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
14 Dec 2020Editorial Decision: Accept