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Health-related Quality of Life and Quality of Care in pregnant and postnatal women during the COVID-19 pandemic: a case control study
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  • Fátimah Alaya,
  • Amy P Worrall,
  • Fiona O'Toole,
  • Jillian Doyle,
  • Richard Duffy ,
  • Michael Geary
Fátimah Alaya
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
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Amy P Worrall
Rotunda Hospital
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Fiona O'Toole
Rotunda Hospital
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Jillian Doyle
Rotunda Hospital
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Richard Duffy
Rotunda Hospital
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Michael Geary
Rotunda Hospital
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Abstract

Objective To compare self-reported health related quality of life (HRQoL) and quality of care (QoC) received between pregnant and postnatal women during the COVID-19 pandemic at a tertiary unit. Design A prospective case-control study Population Pregnant women, ≥18 years of age, with capacity, who spoke English, and attended the tertiary unit during the pandemic. Methods 18 perinatal women who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 and 20 asymptomatic control perinatal women were recruited. Demographic characteristics were collected and all participants completed the Short Form (SF-12), Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure (CORE-OM) and Quality from the Patient’s Perspective (QPP). Means scores in both cohorts were compared. Main Outcome Measures Assessment of psychological distress, HRQoL, QoC and their correlates. Results 95% of the Non-COVID cohort were Caucasian, while 67% of the pregnant women who had COVID-19 were not Caucasian (x2=16.01, p<0.0001). The mean SF-12 for physical health and functionality in the COVID cohort had significantly lower scores (36.54 vs 49.21, 95% CI [6.9 to 20.2], p<0.0002). There was no difference in mental health and wellbeing scores between the COVID and Non-COVID cohorts. The QoC experienced by both cohorts was similar and very positive. Conclusions Among pregnant women who tested positive for COVID-19, there was a significant greater burden on the women’s physical health. Mental health and psychological status was similar in both groups. High quality of care during a pandemic is possible to deliver in a maternity setting, irrespective of the patient’s COVID status.