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Assessment of Different Approaches to Resolve Positioning Pain Before Spinal Anesthesia in Hip Fractures
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  • Tuna Ertürk,
  • Temel Güner,
  • Cengiz Yıldırım,
  • Ayşın Ersoy
Tuna Ertürk
Sultan Abdülhamid Han Training and Research Hospital
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Temel Güner
Sultan Abdülhamid Han Training and Research Hospital
Author Profile
Cengiz Yıldırım
Sultan Abdülhamid Han Training and Research Hospital
Author Profile
Ayşın Ersoy
Sultan Abdülhamid Han Training and Research Hospital
Author Profile

Abstract

Aim Currently, the population in the world is rapidly increasing due to technological developments and convenient access to health services. Due to comorbidities in elderly patients, hip fractures are frequently observed after exposure to environmental trauma. To reduce pain during positioning in spinal anesthesia, fascia iliaca compartment block (FICB) can be applied easily and reliably. Material and Method Our study included 100 patients undergoing operations due to hip fracture and administered spinal anesthesia after FICB. The group with FICB accompanied by ultrasound (USG) had the blockage needle advanced to the compartment under the fascia iliaca and 15 mL bupivacaine + 10 mL 2% lidocaine was administered. Sitting position was given for spinal anesthesia 20 minutes later and procedure duration and NRS scores were recorded. In the group with FICB completed with the landmark method (LAND), the spina iliaca anterior superior (SIAS) and pubic tubercle were connected with a line. The same amount of local anesthetic was administered to the external 1/3 portion of this line with the double pop technique. Procedure durations and NRS scores were recorded. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of NRS scores (p>0.05). There was a statistical difference found in terms of FICB administration durations (p<0.05). Conclusion FICB administered both with USG and using the anatomic landmark method provides sufficient analgesia for the positioning stage of spinal anesthesia at similar levels. However, imaging of structures with ultrasound will provide more reliable blockage when there is access to the device and no time problems.