loading page

Management of breast abscesses by ultrasound-guided needle aspiration and continuation of breastfeeding: a pilot study
  • +8
  • virginie rigourd,
  • laure benoit,
  • marine driessen,
  • caroline charlier,
  • emanuelle bille,
  • brune pommeret,
  • Elise Leroy-Terquem,
  • ms murmu,
  • agnes guyonnet,
  • nathalie baunot ,
  • jean-yves seror
virginie rigourd
Necker-Enfants Malades Hospitals
Author Profile
laure benoit
Necker-Enfants Malades Hospitals
Author Profile
marine driessen
Necker-Enfants Malades Hospitals
Author Profile
caroline charlier
Necker-Enfants Malades Hospitals
Author Profile
emanuelle bille
Necker-Enfants Malades Hospitals
Author Profile
brune pommeret
Hospital Centre Gustave Tourcoing
Author Profile
Elise Leroy-Terquem
Necker-Enfants Malades Hospitals
Author Profile
ms murmu
Necker-Enfants Malades Hospitals
Author Profile
agnes guyonnet
Necker-Enfants Malades Hospitals
Author Profile
nathalie baunot
Necker-Enfants Malades Hospitals
Author Profile
jean-yves seror
Necker-Enfants Malades Hospitals
Author Profile

Abstract

Background – In case of breast abscess, many patients stop breastfeeding on the advice of a health professional. Purpose – We reviewed our experience of treatment of lactating breast abscesses by ultrasound-guided aspiration and suggest an algorithm of their management. We also analyzed the continuation of breastfeeding of these patients after advices from trained teams. Materiel and methods – We conducted a retrospective study from April 2016 to April 2017, including 34 patients referred for a breast abscess during lactation at the Duroc Breast Imaging Center. Results – A single aspiration was sufficient in 64.3% of cases. The delay between the occurrence of the abscess and the indication for drainage was significantly higher for patients who have needed finally surgical drainage (p = 0,0031). There were no difference of size of abscesses between patients receiving needle aspiration alone and those who have undergone surgery (p = 0,97). All patients who had been managed by needle aspiration continued breastfeeding after the treatment and 40% of the patients were still breastfeeding at 6 months. Conclusion - The management of lactating breast abscess by ultrasound-guided needle aspiration is an effective alternative to surgery. It appears to be effective regardless of the size of the abscess and is compatible with the continuation of breastfeeding. Our study has indeed shown that if they are well advised, the majority of patients continue breastfeeding so that it is essential that health professionals be better trained regarding the management of breastfeeding complication