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Identifying surface water evaporation loss of inland river basin based on evaporation enrichment model
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  • Zhigang Sun,
  • guofeng zhu,
  • Zhuanxia Zhang,
  • Yuanxiao Xu,
  • Leilei Yong,
  • Qiaozhuo Wan,
  • Huiying Ma,
  • Liyuan Sang,
  • Yuwei Liu
Zhigang Sun
Northwest Normal University
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guofeng zhu
Northwest Normal University
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Zhuanxia Zhang
Northwest Normal University
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Yuanxiao Xu
Northwest Normal University
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Leilei Yong
Northwest Normal University
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Qiaozhuo Wan
Northwest Normal University
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Huiying Ma
Northwest Normal University
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Liyuan Sang
Northwest Normal University
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Yuwei Liu
Northwest Normal University
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Abstract

Accurately quantifying the evaporation loss of surface water is essential for regional water resources management, especially in arid and semi-arid areas where water resources are already scarce. The long-term monitoring of stable isotopes (δ18O and δ2H) in water can provide a sensitive indicator of water loss by evaporation. In this study, we obtained surface water samples of Shiyang River Basin from April to October between 2017 and 2019. The spatial and temporal characteristics of stable isotopes in surface water show the trend of enrichment in summer, depletion in spring, enrichment in deserts and depletion in mountains. The Surface Water Line (SWL) has been defined by the lines: δ2H=7.61δ18O+14.58 for mountainous area, δ2H=4.19δ18O-17.85 for oasis area, δ2H=4.08δ18O-18.92 for desert area. The slope of SWL shows a gradual decrease from mountain to desert, indicating that the evaporation of surface water is gradually increasing. The evaporation loss of stable isotopes in surface water is 24.82% for mountainous area, 32.19% for oasis area, and 70.98% for desert area, respectively. Temperature and air humidity are the main meteorological factors affecting the evaporation loss, and the construction of reservoirs and farmland irrigation are the main man-made factors affecting the evaporation loss.

Peer review status:ACCEPTED

27 Oct 2020Submitted to Hydrological Processes
27 Oct 2020Submission Checks Completed
27 Oct 2020Assigned to Editor
27 Oct 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
16 Nov 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
10 Dec 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Major
05 Jan 20211st Revision Received
05 Jan 2021Submission Checks Completed
05 Jan 2021Assigned to Editor
05 Jan 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
17 Jan 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
14 Feb 2021Editorial Decision: Accept