loading page

Abnormal Baseline liver function tests are associated with death or mechanical ventilation in COVID-19
  • +4
  • Bashar Fteiha,
  • Haytham Abu Khdair,
  • Dolev Perez,
  • Hani Karameh,
  • Ron Skorochod,
  • Eran Goldin,
  • Mahmud Mahamid
Bashar Fteiha
Shaare Zedek Medical Center
Author Profile
Haytham Abu Khdair
Shaare Zedek Medical Center
Author Profile
Dolev Perez
Shaare Zedek Medical Center
Author Profile
Hani Karameh
Shaare Zedek Medical Center
Author Profile
Ron Skorochod
Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School
Author Profile
Eran Goldin
Shaare Zedek Medical Center
Author Profile
Mahmud Mahamid
Shaare Zedek Medical Center
Author Profile

Abstract

Background – Studies investigating the relation between baseline liver abnormality and COVID-19 patients’ outcomes during hospitalization are scarce. The aim of the study is to address and characterize this clinically important association. Methods – Retrospective single-center study of adults hospitalized with COVID-19 infection for whom the baseline liver function tests up to one year prior to the admission were available. The study cohort included hospitalized patients from COVID-19 wards and specialized COVID-19 intensive care unit. Subjects were divided into a normal and abnormal baseline LFT groups that were then compared with respect to demographic characteristics, co-morbidities and patients’ outcomes during hospitalization. Results – 133 of 444 subjects met the inclusion criteria and were included in the study. Of them, 50/133 (37.6%) had abnormal baseline LFTs. The mean age of the cohort subjects was 65.7 ± 22.1 years and the mean BMI was 28.7 ± 13.0. Subjects with abnormal LFTs were more likely to die (22% versus 4.8%, p = 0.004) or require mechanical ventilation (16% versus 4.8%, p = 0.03) during hospitalization when compared to their normal LFT counterparts. Multivariate analysis revealed that abnormal baseline LFT (OR 6, 95% CI 2.0 – 18.4) was the strongest predictor of death or requiring mechanical ventilation followed by diabetes mellitus (OR 4.5, 95% CI 1.3 – 14.8) and congestive heart failure (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.2 – 12.5). Conclusion - patients known to have a baseline LFTs abnormality appear to be at an increased risk for death or mechanical ventilation during hospitalization with COVID-19.