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Growth and Nutrition in Children with Established Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia: A Systematic Review
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  • Sarah Bauer,
  • Charles Vanderpool,
  • Katie Huff,
  • Rebecca Rose,
  • A. Ioana Cristea
Sarah Bauer
Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health
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Charles Vanderpool
Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health
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Katie Huff
Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health
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Rebecca Rose
Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health
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A. Ioana Cristea
Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health
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Abstract

Introduction: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) remains the most common late morbidity of preterm birth. Ongoing clinical care and research have largely focused on the pathogenesis and prevention of BPD in preterm infants. However, preterm infants who develop BPD have significant medical needs that persist throughout their neonatal intensive care unit course and continue post-discharge, including those associated with growth and nutrition. The objective of this study was to systematically review the available literature on nutrition and growth in infants with established BPD and to identify the knowledge and research gaps to provide direction for future studies. Methods: We conducted a systematic literature search in accordance with PRISMA guidelines using Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL and Embase. Titles, abstracts, and full texts were independently reviewed by the authors and selected based on predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Results were summarized qualitatively. Results: Excluding duplicates, 1,949 articles were identified. Of these, 36 articles were selected for inclusion. We identified the following key components of nutrition support and clinical care: Energy Expenditure, Growth and Metabolism; Enteral Nutrition; Supplements; Parenteral Nutrition; Respiratory Outcomes. Conclusions: Despite a large body of literature describing the role of growth and nutrition in the prevention of BPD, research is lacking with respect to interventions and management in the established BPD population. Thus, organized approaches for clinical interventions and trials with respect to growth and nutrition in infants and young children with established BPD are needed. These studies should include multiple centers, due to the small numbers of patients with BPD at each site.

Peer review status:IN REVISION

30 Oct 2020Submitted to Pediatric Pulmonology
02 Nov 2020Submission Checks Completed
02 Nov 2020Assigned to Editor
18 Nov 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
17 Dec 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
23 Dec 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Major
15 Mar 20211st Revision Received
16 Mar 2021Submission Checks Completed
16 Mar 2021Assigned to Editor
16 Mar 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
23 Mar 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
09 Apr 2021Editorial Decision: Revise Minor