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Ultrasound studies on Mycoplasma bronchopneumonia
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  • Clelia Tripaldi,
  • Marella Polito,
  • Onofrio Iacoviello,
  • Vincenzo Basile,
  • Teresa De Bellis,
  • Maria Fortunato,
  • Francesca Laforgia,
  • Mariangela Rubino,
  • Egisto Scalini,
  • Maria Silletti,
  • Ignazio Lofù
Clelia Tripaldi
Hospital of Monopoli
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Marella Polito
Training Course in General Medicine, Bari Medical Association, Italy
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Onofrio Iacoviello
University of Bari
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Vincenzo Basile
Hospital of Monopoli
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Teresa De Bellis
Hospital of Monopoli
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Maria Fortunato
Hospital of Monopoli
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Francesca Laforgia
Hospital of Monopoli
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Mariangela Rubino
Hospital of Monopoli
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Egisto Scalini
Hospital of Monopoli
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Maria Silletti
Hospital of Monopoli
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Ignazio Lofù
Hospital of Monopoli
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Abstract

Abstract Background: Pediatric bronchopneumonia represents a clinical challenge, especially when it comes to the identification of its etiology. Study design: We performed a retrospective study on 100 patients admitted to our pediatric department. Only patients with bronchopneumonic consolidations were selected, discharged with a diagnosis of Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) or bronchopneumonia. The purpose of our study was to identify Mycoplasma pneumonia based on lung ultrasound (LUS) findings. Methodology: At least two lung LUS were performed on each patient: on admission and few days after start of therapy, with some patients undergoing a third ultrasound evaluation approximately one week after discharge. These reports were collected for each patient together with clinical and laboratory data. The study population was divided into two groups: patients who tested positive for Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Myc-CAP) and negative ones (non-Myc-CAP). All patients performed serological test for determination of anti-mycoplasma antibodies, and in doubtful cases also molecular test with PCR on pharyngeal exudate. Results: The results obtained after statistical analysis showed no significant differences in LUS findings between the two groups, that could allow a positive differential diagnosis of Myc-CAP without resorting to laboratory testing. Conclusions: LUS undoubtedly represents a valid and irreplaceable help in the morphological study of pulmonary lesions over the course of disease from the time of admission to follow-up.