loading page

Prevalence of latent iron deficiency in early pregnancy in a tertiary care hospital in Sri Lanka: A cross-sectional study
  • +5
  • Neelakshi De Silva,
  • Senani Williams,
  • Durgadevi Moratuwagama,
  • Indika Siriwardena,
  • Anandadeep Mandal,
  • Carmeline Motha,
  • Thilina Palihawadena,
  • A Pathmeswaren
Neelakshi De Silva
Walsall Manor Hospital
Author Profile
Senani Williams
University of Kelaniya
Author Profile
Durgadevi Moratuwagama
Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board
Author Profile
Indika Siriwardena
Ministry of Justice of Sri Lanka
Author Profile
Anandadeep Mandal
University of Birmingham
Author Profile
Carmeline Motha
University of Kelaniya
Author Profile
Thilina Palihawadena
University of Kelaniya
Author Profile
A Pathmeswaren
University of Kelaniya
Author Profile

Abstract

Objectives To estimate the prevalence of latent iron deficiency (LID) among pregnant women, assess LID in relation to parity, age, education, and household income, and to determine correlations between LID and red cell indices, red cell distribution width (RDW), and red cell morphology. Design Cross-sectional design Setting North Colombo Teaching Hospital, Sri Lanka. Sample Participants comprised 355 pregnant women with normal haemoglobin levels seeking antenatal care within < 20 weeks of gestation. Method Data were obtained from interviews and antenatal records. Participant full blood count (FBC), serum ferritin levels, and blood films were analysed. Main Outcome Measures Prevalence of LID, demographic data (age, parity, period of gestation, gap between pregnancies, income, and education), and blood film morphology. Results LID prevalence was 54%. Statistical significance for the gap between pregnancies being < 2 years was observed but not for participant’s age, parity, income, and education. Blood film morphology depicted statistically significant presence of hypochromic microcytic red cells and pencil cells. RDW was significant in indicating the presence of LID. Among those with LID, 25% had ferritin level in the iron deficiency range. Conclusions LID is highly prevalent in early pregnancy and 25% of participants had ferritin levels in the iron deficiency range. Presence of raised RDW, hypochromic microcytic red cells, pencil cells, and <2 years’ gap between pregnancies were indicators of LID. To identify pregnant women with LID, blood film, haemoglobin, and RDW could be recommended as basic tests, and ferritin test as an affirmative one.