loading page

Understanding 3D structural complexity of individual Scots pine trees with different management history
  • +5
  • Ninni Saarinen,
  • Kim Calders,
  • Ville Kankare,
  • Tuomas Yrttimaa,
  • Samuli Junttila,
  • Saija Huuskonen,
  • Jari Hynynen,
  • Hans Verbeeck
Ninni Saarinen
University of Helsinki Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry
Author Profile
Kim Calders
Ghent University Faculty of Bioscience Engineering
Author Profile
Ville Kankare
University of Eastern Finland
Author Profile
Tuomas Yrttimaa
University of Eastern Finland Faculty of Science and Forestry
Author Profile
Samuli Junttila
University of Eastern Finland Faculty of Science and Forestry
Author Profile
Saija Huuskonen
Natural Resources Institute Finland
Author Profile
Jari Hynynen
Natural Resources Institute Finland
Author Profile
Hans Verbeeck
Universiteit Gent
Author Profile

Abstract

Tree functional traits together with processes such as forest regeneration, growth, and mortality affect forest and tree structure. Forest management inherently impacts these processes. Moreover, forest structure, biodiversity, resilience, and carbon uptake can be sustained and enhanced with forest management activities. To assess structural complexity of individual trees, comprehensive and quantitative measures are needed, and they are often lacking for current forest management practices. Here, we utilized 3D information from individual Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees obtained with terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to first, assess effects of forest management on structural complexity of individual trees, and second, understand relationship between several tree attributes and structural complexity. We studied structural complexity of individual trees represented by a single scale independent metric called “box dimension”. This study aimed at identifying drivers affecting structural complexity of individual Scots pine trees in boreal forest conditions. The results showed that thinning increased structural complexity of individual Scots pine trees. Furthermore, we found a relationship between structural complexity and stem and crown size and shape as well as tree growth. Thus, it can be concluded that forest management affected structural complexity of individual Scots pine trees in managed boreal forests, and stem, crown, and growth attributes were identified as drivers of it.

Peer review status:Published

05 Nov 2020Submitted to Ecology and Evolution
06 Nov 2020Submission Checks Completed
06 Nov 2020Assigned to Editor
18 Nov 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
16 Dec 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
22 Dec 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Minor
28 Dec 20201st Revision Received
29 Dec 2020Submission Checks Completed
29 Dec 2020Assigned to Editor
29 Dec 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
04 Jan 2021Editorial Decision: Accept
31 Jan 2021Published in Ecology and Evolution. 10.1002/ece3.7216