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PSYCHOSOCIAL IMPACT OF CORONAVIRUS LOCKDOWN ON NIGERIANS
  • +19
  • Godfrey Ejiroghene Akpojotor,
  • Otega Okinono,
  • E O Ndakara,
  • Calistar Kidochukwu Obi,
  • Patrick Ifeanyi Okonta,
  • Emmanuel Morka,
  • Abel Maviano Jonathan,
  • Emmanuel Ozioma Michael,
  • Wisdom Oghenevwogaga Egboduku,
  • Newton Ighomaro Okposo,
  • Benard Chinedu Okolugbo,
  • Theodora Ogharanduku,
  • Nathanial Okpara,
  • Ewomazino Odibo,
  • Marcus Ifeanyi Ossiaugbo,
  • Benjamin Ubreye Owhe-Ureghe,
  • Mary Oghenerioborue Agbogidi,
  • Godwin Avwioro,
  • Nyerovwo John Tonukari,
  • Godfrey Ejiroghene Akpojotor,
  • Patrick Goddey Nmorsi,
  • Andy Ogochukwu Egwunyenga
Godfrey Ejiroghene Akpojotor
Author Profile
Otega Okinono
Department of Economics, Delta State University
E O Ndakara
Department of Sociology and Psychology, Delta State University
Calistar Kidochukwu Obi
Department of Geography and regional Planning, Delta State University
Patrick Ifeanyi Okonta
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Clinical Medicine, College of Health Sciences
Emmanuel Morka
Department of Microbiology, Delta State University
Abel Maviano Jonathan
Department of Mathematics, Delta State University
Emmanuel Ozioma Michael
Department of Botany, Delta State University
Wisdom Oghenevwogaga Egboduku
Department of Botany, Delta State University
Newton Ighomaro Okposo
Department of Mathematics, Delta State University
Benard Chinedu Okolugbo
Department of Animal and Environmental Biology, Delta State University
Theodora Ogharanduku
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Department of Animal and Environmental Biology, Delta State University
Nathanial Okpara
Department of Physics, Delta State University
Ewomazino Odibo
Department of Animal and Environmental Biology, Delta State University
Marcus Ifeanyi Ossiaugbo
Department of Mathematics, Delta State University
Benjamin Ubreye Owhe-Ureghe
Centre for Biotechnology Research, Delta State University, Department of Microbiology, Delta State University
Mary Oghenerioborue Agbogidi
Centre for Plants Conservation and Utilization, Delta State University, Department of Botany, Delta State University
Godwin Avwioro
Department of Science Laboratory Technology, Delta State University
Nyerovwo John Tonukari
Department of Biochemistry, Delta State University
Godfrey Ejiroghene Akpojotor
Centre for Research and International Programmes, Delta State University, Department of Physics, Delta State University
Patrick Goddey Nmorsi
Advanced Research Centre, Delta State University, Department of Animal and Environmental Biology, Delta State University
Andy Ogochukwu Egwunyenga
Vice Chancellor's Office, Delta State University, Department of Animal and Environmental Biology, Delta State University

Abstract

In this study, psychosocial impact of coronavirus lockdown on Nigerians was assessed through a cross-sectional descriptive survey across the 36 States and Federal Capital Territory in Nigeria. The survey comprised a sample of 740 adults (54.32% male and 45.68% female). The 3 psychosocial metrics investigated were depression, stress and anxiety. Data obtained in the survey were analysed using the descriptive (percentages and frequency) and inferential (test for association using chi-square trend test-Cochran-Armitage trend) statistics. Findings showed that coronavirus lockdown had a psychosocial impact on Nigerians, particularly on mental wellbeing as agreed upon by 50% of respondents. While the lockdown was established to have ushered in symptoms of anxiety and depression, educational level and religion were statistically significant in association with depression at χ 2 = 11.510, p-value = 0.0007 and χ 2 =8.3419, p-value = 0.0039 respectively. Cases of domestic violence with emphasis on rape increased due to frustration, idleness and inaccessibility to sex commercial workers. Based on these findings, it is concluded that coronavirus lockdown had a psychosocial impact on Nigerians. Therefore, it is recommended that Nigerian governments should put more stringent measures aimed at containing these social vices, by proactively engaging law enforcement agencies to prosecute those that violate curfew hours. Again, the government should devise other measures of involving citizens in proactive activities that could disengage them from inexplicable behavioural patterns; this would enable them develop the right attitude for positive mental wellbeing.