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Natural Course and Factors Associated with Allergic Diseases in Early Life: Data from a Developing Asian Country
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  • Thansinee Saetae,
  • Pantipa Chatchatee,
  • Yong Poovorawan,
  • Nasamon Wanlapakorn,
  • Kanlada Wongworapat,
  • Surasith Chaithongwongwattana ,
  • Jarungchit Ngamphaiboon,
  • Leuridan Elke,
  • Narissara Suratannon
Thansinee Saetae
Chulalongkorn University Faculty of Medicine
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Pantipa Chatchatee
Chulalongkorn University Faculty of Medicine
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Yong Poovorawan
Chulalongkorn University Faculty of Medicine
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Nasamon Wanlapakorn
Chulalongkorn University Faculty of Medicine
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Kanlada Wongworapat
Chulalongkorn University Faculty of Medicine
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Surasith Chaithongwongwattana
Chulalongkorn University Faculty of Medicine
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Jarungchit Ngamphaiboon
Chulalongkorn University Faculty of Medicine
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Leuridan Elke
University of Antwerp Drie Eiken Campus
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Narissara Suratannon
Chulalongkorn University Faculty of Medicine
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Abstract

Background: The incidence of allergic diseases has been rising in the last decades. The interplay between genetic and environmental factors underlined these complex diseases. Data concerning natural history and risk factors associated with allergic diseases in developing Asian countries are limited. Methods: A population-based birth cohort study was conducted in Bangkok, Thailand. Perinatal and postnatal factors were prospectively collected by questionnaires. Sensitization was identified by skin prick test. Food allergy (FA) was confirmed by oral food challenge. Results: A total of 369 mother-children pairs were enrolled and follow-up until the age of 30 months. The cumulative incidence of allergic diseases was 46.2%. High family income significantly increased risk of atopic dermatitis (AD) and ever-wheezing. Maternal history of allergic diseases and exclusive breastfeeding longer than six months significantly increased risk of FA. Antibiotics use in infants significantly associated with FA, ever-wheezing and rhinitis. Infants with FA had a 6.5-fold increased risk of AD while infants with AD had an 8.5-fold increased risk of FA. AR had a 3.5-fold increased risk in developing ever-wheezing. One-third of the subjects had aeroallergen sensitization. Conclusion: Prevalence of allergic diseases in developing Asian country was considerably high. AD and FA were the most prevalent allergic diseases during the first years of life. Meanwhile, the prevalence of wheezing and rhinitis subsequently increased over time. High sensitization rate to aeroallergens was found in the first two years of life. Maternal atopy, high family income, early life exposure to antibiotics and prolonged breast-feeding increased risk of allergic diseases in our cohort.