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Risk factors for unplanned removal of central venous catheters in hospitalized children with hematological and oncological disorders
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  • Moe Miyagishima,
  • Hamada Motoharu,
  • Yuji Hirayama,
  • Hideki Muramatsu,
  • Takahisa Tainaka,
  • Chiyoe Shirota,
  • Akinari Hinoki,
  • Takahiro Imaizumi,
  • Masahiro Nakatochi,
  • Eri Nishikawa,
  • Nozomu Kawashima,
  • Atsushi Narita,
  • Nobuhiro Nishio,
  • Seiji Kojima,
  • Yoshiyuki Takahashi
Moe Miyagishima
Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine Faculty of Medicine
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Hamada Motoharu
Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine Faculty of Medicine
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Yuji Hirayama
Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine Faculty of Medicine
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Hideki Muramatsu
Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine Faculty of Medicine
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Takahisa Tainaka
Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine Faculty of Medicine
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Chiyoe Shirota
Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine Faculty of Medicine
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Akinari Hinoki
Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine Faculty of Medicine
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Takahiro Imaizumi
Nagoya University Hospital
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Masahiro Nakatochi
Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine Faculty of Medicine
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Eri Nishikawa
Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine Faculty of Medicine
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Nozomu Kawashima
Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine Faculty of Medicine
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Atsushi Narita
Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine Faculty of Medicine
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Nobuhiro Nishio
Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine Faculty of Medicine
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Seiji Kojima
Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine Faculty of Medicine
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Yoshiyuki Takahashi
Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine Faculty of Medicine
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Abstract

Background: Central venous catheters (CVCs) have been essential devices for the treatment of children with hematological and oncological disorders. Only few studies investigated the complications and selections of different types of CVCs in these pediatric patients. This study aimed to compare risk factors for unplanned removal of two commonly used CVCs, i.e., peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) and tunneled CVCs, and propose better device selection for the patient. Procedure: This retrospective, single center cohort analysis was conducted on pediatric patients with hematological and oncological disorders inserted with either a PICC or a tunneled CVC. Results: Between January 1, 2013, and December 31, 2015, 89 patients inserted with tunneled CVCs (total 21,395 catheter-days) and 84 with PICCs (total 9,177 catheter-days) were followed up until the catheter removal. The median duration of catheterization was 88 days in PICCs and 186 days in tunneled CVCs (p = 1.24×10-9). PICCs at the 3-month cumulative incidence of catheter occlusion (5.2% vs. 0%, p = 4.08×10-3) and total unplanned removal (29.0% vs 7.0%, p = 0.0316) were significantly higher, whereas no significant difference was observed in the cumulative incidence of central line-associated bloodstream infection (11.8% vs. 2.3%, p = 0.664). Multivariable analysis identified younger age (<2 years) (subdistribution hazard ratio [SHR], 2.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27–4.14) and PICCs (SHR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.48–5.02) were independent risk factors for unplanned removal. Conclusion: Our results suggest that tunnel CVCs would be a preferred device for children with hematological and oncological disorders requiring long-term, intensive treatment.