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Isolation and characterization of a mammalian orthoreovirus type 3 in a fecal sample of wild boar in Japan
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  • Wenjing Zhang,
  • Michiyo Kataoka,
  • Yen Doan,
  • Toru Oi,
  • Tetsuya Furuya,
  • mami oba,
  • Tetsuya Mizutani,
  • Tomoichiro Oka,
  • Tiancheng Li,
  • Makato Nagai
Wenjing Zhang
Kokuritsu Kansensho Kenkyujo Murayama Chosha
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Michiyo Kataoka
National Institute of Infectious Diseases
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Yen Doan
Tokyo Medical and Dental University
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Toru Oi
Ishikawa Prefectural University
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Tetsuya Furuya
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology
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mami oba
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology
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Tetsuya Mizutani
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology
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Tomoichiro Oka
Kokuritsu Kansensho Kenkyujo Murayama Chosha
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Tiancheng Li
Kokuritsu Kansensho Kenkyujo Murayama Chosha
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Makato Nagai
Azabu University
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Abstract

Mammalian orthoreoviruses (MRVs) have been identified in various mammalian species, including humans, bats, and pigs. However, MRV isolation and complete genome sequences from wild boars have not yet been reported. In this study, we isolated, sequenced, and analyzed an MRV from a free-living wild boar in Japan using a porcine sapelovirus-resistant cell line N1380. The complete and empty virus particles were obtained from the N1380 cell culture supernatants, and complete genome sequences were obtained from complete virus particles. Sequence analyses revealed that the isolated MRV, named TY-14, was classified as MRV3 and had a close genetic relationship with lion in a Japanese zoo MRV2 (L2, L3, and M3 genes) and human MRV2 from Japan (S2 gene). Phylogenetic analyses showed that TY-14 clustered only with bat MRVs in the M1 gene, while TY-14 formed a cluster with several animal MRVs in the M2 and S3 genes, and independently branched in the L1, S1, and S4 genes, suggesting a genetic relationship with other unknown origins. Recombination events were identified in the M2 gene. These results suggest that TY-14 was generated by reassortment and recombination events involving MRVs circulating in Japan, bats, and other unknown origins.