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Tandem Nanobody: a feasible way to improve the capacity of affinity chromatography
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  • Jinheng Fu,
  • Yunxiang Huang,
  • Yinfeng Zhong,
  • Wenyuan Shuai,
  • Hang Zhang,
  • Yanping Li,
  • Qinghua He,
  • Zhui Tu
Jinheng Fu
Nanchang University
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Yunxiang Huang
Nanchang University
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Yinfeng Zhong
Nanchang University
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Wenyuan Shuai
Nanchang University
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Hang Zhang
Nanchang University
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Yanping Li
Nanchang University
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Qinghua He
Nanchang University
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Zhui Tu
Nanchang University
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Abstract

Nanobodies, referred to the binding domain of the heavy-chain-only antibodies, are the smallest antigen recognition unit. The molecular weight of monomeric nanobodies is about one-tenth of the conventional antibodies. The small size of nanobodies facilitates genetic manipulation and recombinant expression. This study aimed to investigate the effects of nanobody multivalency on the binding capacity of affinity resin. The nanobody (namely AFV), which binds to the fragment crystallizable (Fc) region of immunoglobulin G (IgG), was fused to the N-terminal of HaloTag in the form of monomeric (H-AFV), dimer (H-diAFV), trimer (H-triAFV), and tetramer (H-tetAFV). The fusion proteins were solubly expressed in Escherichia coli yielding at least 9.9 mg L-1. The biolayer interferometry confirmed an increment of avidity as the increase of AFV valences. The four recombinant proteins in crude cell lysate were site-specifically immobilized onto the Halo ligand resin via the self-labeling HaloTag, respectively. The generated affinity resins were able to isolate high purity IgG from mouse plasma. An improvement of 73.7% of the static binding capacity was achieved by the H-diAFV resin as compared to the H-AFV affinity resin.