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A good QoL is beneficial for outgrowing egg allergy
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  • Kana Hamada,
  • Mizuho Nagao,
  • Ryo Imakiire,
  • Kanae Furuya,
  • Yumi Mizuno,
  • Yasunori Sato,
  • Mayumi Matsunaga,
  • Shingo Yamada,
  • Kazutaka Nogami,
  • Miyuki Hoshi,
  • Taiga Kobori,
  • Keigo Kainuma,
  • Kazumoto Iijima,
  • Takao Fujisawa
Kana Hamada
National Hospital Organization Mie National Hospital
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Mizuho Nagao
National Hospital Organization Mie National Hospital
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Ryo Imakiire
National Hospital Organization Mie National Hospital
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Kanae Furuya
National Hospital Organization Mie National Hospital
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Yumi Mizuno
National Hospital Organization Mie National Hospital
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Yasunori Sato
Keio University School of Medicine
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Mayumi Matsunaga
National Hospital Organization Mie National Hospital
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Shingo Yamada
National Hospital Organization Mie National Hospital
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Kazutaka Nogami
National Hospital Organization Mie National Hospital
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Miyuki Hoshi
National Hospital Organization Mie National Hospital
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Taiga Kobori
National Hospital Organization Mie National Hospital
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Keigo Kainuma
National Hospital Organization Mie National Hospital
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Kazumoto Iijima
Kobe University
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Takao Fujisawa
National Hospital Organization Mie National Hospital
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Abstract

Background: Safely liberalizing the diet to include an allergenic food may accelerate resolution of food allergy. The outcome of liberalization, however, varies among patients. Methods: We conducted a prospective observational study to identify factors associated with outcome for egg allergy 1 year after oral food challenge (OFC). We enrolled children < 72 months-old who had egg allergy and underwent OFC for determination of the safe intake quantity of egg allergen. At enrollment, each child’s clinical background was recorded. The Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire–Parent Form (FAQLQ–PF) was administered to the caregivers to assess their children’s QoL. Dietary advice based on the OFC result was then provided to support safe consumption of eggs. At 1 year after OFC, the quantity of egg each child safely consumed in daily life was surveyed. We classified the egg allergy outcome as Outgrowing (Group O) if the quantity increased during the 1 year, or as Non-outgrowing (Group N) if it did not. Factors associated with the outcome were investigated by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 93 children were enrolled, and after 1 year 57 finished in Group O and 36 in Group N. The mean FAQLQ-PF score at baseline was significantly lower (i.e., better QoL) in group O than in group N. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified comorbid asthma, comorbid atopic dermatitis and a poor QoL as factors predicting an unfavorable outcome. Conclusion: QoL may affect food allergy outcome. Intervention focusing on QoL may promote outgrowing food allergies.

Peer review status:ACCEPTED

07 Dec 2020Submitted to Pediatric Allergy and Immunology
14 Dec 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
08 Jan 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
11 Jan 2021Editorial Decision: Revise Major
09 Apr 20211st Revision Received
09 Apr 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
11 Apr 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
30 Apr 2021Editorial Decision: Accept