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Short Term Respiratory Outcomes in Children with Antibody Positive PIMS -TS
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  • Deevena Chinthala,
  • Chris Hine,
  • Pamela Dawson,
  • Steven Welch,
  • Scott Hackett,
  • Deepthi Jyothish,
  • Barnaby Scholefield,
  • Hari Krishnan Kanthimathinathan,
  • Ciaran McCardle,
  • Ashish Chickermane,
  • Eslam Al- Abadi,
  • Prasad Nagakumar
Deevena Chinthala
Birmingham Women's and Children's NHS Foundation Trust
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Chris Hine
Birmingham Women's and Children's NHS Foundation Trust
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Pamela Dawson
Birmingham Women's and Children's NHS Foundation Trust
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Steven Welch
University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust
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Scott Hackett
University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust
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Deepthi Jyothish
Birmingham Women's and Children's Hospital
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Barnaby Scholefield
Birmingham Women's and Children's NHS Foundation Trust
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Hari Krishnan Kanthimathinathan
Birmingham Women's and Children's NHS Foundation Trust
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Ciaran McCardle
Birmingham Women's and Children's NHS Foundation Trust
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Ashish Chickermane
Birmingham Women’s and Children’s Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
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Eslam Al- Abadi
Birmingham Women's and Children's NHS Foundation Trust
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Prasad Nagakumar
Birmingham Women's and Children's Hospital
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Abstract

Paediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome: temporally associated with SARS-COV-2 (PIMS-TS) is a well described rare but severe COVID-19 related syndrome. PIMS-TS have been reported in children from geographical areas of high COVID-19 infection. Most children with PIMS-TS require management in an intensive care unit with variable respiratory involvement. Adults recovering from COVID-19 infection have been reported to suffer from respiratory morbidity but such outcomes are unknown in children. We present the first report of normal short term respiratory outcomes as measured by spirometry in children with SARS-COV-2 antibody positive, PIMS-TS syndrome managed at a specialist children’s hospital in the UK.

Peer review status:IN REVISION

02 Jan 2021Submitted to Pediatric Pulmonology
06 Jan 2021Assigned to Editor
06 Jan 2021Submission Checks Completed
07 Jan 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
11 Feb 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
11 Feb 2021Editorial Decision: Revise Major