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A novel mast cell-dependent allergic peritonitis model
  • Hadas Pahima,
  • Pier Giorgio Puzzovio,
  • Francesca Levi-Schaffer
Hadas Pahima
Hebrew University of Jerusalem Faculty of Medicine
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Pier Giorgio Puzzovio
Hebrew University of Jerusalem Faculty of Medicine
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Francesca Levi-Schaffer
Hebrew University of Jerusalem Faculty of Medicine
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Abstract

Background: Typical murine models of allergic inflammation are induced by the combination of ovalbumin and aluminum hydroxide. However, accumulating evidence indicates that, in models of asthma and atopic dermatitis, allergic inflammation can be generated in the absence of aluminum hydroxide. Moreover, co-administration of S. aureus enterotoxin B with ovalbumin can enhance inflammation. Objective: The objective of this study was to establish a rapid and mast cell-dependent murine model of allergic inflammation by inducing allergic peritonitis using ovalbumin and S. aureus enterotoxin B. Methods: Allergic peritonitis was induced in C57BL/6 mice by subcutaneous sensitization and intraperitoneal challenge with ovalbumin and S. aureus enterotoxin B. Disease characteristics were assessed by flow cytometry, ELISA, Trypan Blue exclusion and colorimetric assays. Results: Time course of the allergic peritonitis revealed a peak of peritoneal inflammation 48h after challenge, as assessed by total cells and eosinophil counts. Decrease of cell numbers started 96h post challenge with complete clearance within 168h. Moreover, significantly higher levels of tryptase and increased vascular permeability were found 30 min following challenge. Allergic inflammation induction by ovalbumin and S. aureus enterotoxin B was impaired in mast cells deficient mice and partially restored by mice reconstitution with bone marrow derived mast cells, indicating the mast cell role in this model. Conclusion: We present a novel model of allergic peritonitis that is mast cell-dependent, simple and robust. Moreover, the use of S. aureus enterotoxin B better resembles human allergic inflammation, which is known to be characterized by the colonization of Staphylococcus aureus.

Peer review status:ACCEPTED

05 Nov 2020Submitted to Clinical & Experimental Immunology
06 Nov 2020Submission Checks Completed
06 Nov 2020Assigned to Editor
20 Jan 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
18 Mar 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
29 Mar 2021Editorial Decision: Revise Major
04 Apr 20211st Revision Received
06 Apr 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
30 Apr 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
03 May 2021Editorial Decision: Accept