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Feasibility and Acceptability of a Home-based Resistance Training Intervention in Adolescent and Young Adult Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Survivors
  • +6
  • Tyler Ketterl,
  • Sheri Ballard,
  • Miranda Bradford,
  • Eric Chow,
  • Kari Jenssen,
  • Sam Myers,
  • Abby Rosenberg,
  • Matt Van Doren,
  • K. Scott Baker
Tyler Ketterl
Seattle Children's Hospital
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Sheri Ballard
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
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Miranda Bradford
Seattle Children's Research Institute
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Eric Chow
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
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Kari Jenssen
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
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Sam Myers
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
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Abby Rosenberg
Seattle Children's Hospital
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Matt Van Doren
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
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K. Scott Baker
University of Washington School of Medicine
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Abstract

BACKGROUND Adolescent and young adult (AYA) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) survivors are at increased risk of metabolic syndrome and lean body mass (LBM) deficits. Resistance training (RT) is a potential intervention to improve LBM, metabolic fitness and reduce risk of cardiovascular disease. PROCEDURE Eligible participants ages 13-39 years, 80-120 days post-HCT, transfusion independent, and prednisone dose <1 mg/kg/day were approached. Baseline assessments of body composition (DXA), anthropometrics and strength testing were completed and participants were taught a 12-week, home-based RT intervention with weekly remote coaching. Follow-up assessments were at day +200 (FU1) and +365 post-HCT (FU2). Feasibility targets were 1) 60% enrollment of approached patients, 2) 80% completion of weekly phone calls and 3) 80% completion of the RT intervention and FU1 assessments. Acceptability was measured by recommendation of the intervention to an AYA HCT survivor. RESULTS Twenty of 31 (65%) eligible AYAs enrolled. Two participants failed to complete baseline measurements (1=scheduling barriers, 1=passive refusal) and 4 participants who completed baseline assessments did not receive the intervention (2=medical reasons, 2=no longer interested). Of the 13 who received the intervention, 11 (85%) completed FU1 and completed 88.5% of coaching calls. LBM (kg) increased or remained unchanged in 9/9 participants with complete body composition data at FU1 (mean 1.1 kg; 95%CI: 0.4,1.9). All participants who completed FU1 reported they would recommend the intervention to an AYA HCT survivor. CONCLUSIONS A home-based RT intervention in AYA HCT survivors early post HCT is both feasible and acceptable and may maintain or increase LBM.

Peer review status:ACCEPTED

02 Feb 2021Submission Checks Completed
02 Feb 2021Assigned to Editor
02 Feb 2021Submitted to Pediatric Blood & Cancer
02 Feb 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
20 Feb 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
21 Feb 2021Editorial Decision: Revise Major
07 Apr 2021Assigned to Editor
07 Apr 2021Submission Checks Completed
07 Apr 20211st Revision Received
08 Apr 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
28 Apr 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
01 May 2021Editorial Decision: Revise Major
26 May 20212nd Revision Received
26 May 2021Submission Checks Completed
26 May 2021Assigned to Editor
27 May 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
13 Jun 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
16 Jun 2021Editorial Decision: Revise Minor
17 Jun 2021Assigned to Editor
17 Jun 2021Submission Checks Completed
17 Jun 20213rd Revision Received
18 Jun 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
18 Jun 2021Editorial Decision: Accept