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Contrasting demographic histories revealed in two invasive populations of the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans
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  • Inger Skrede,
  • Claude Murat,
  • Jaqueline Hess,
  • sundy Maurice,
  • Jørn Henrik Sønstebø,
  • Annegret Kohler,
  • Dominique Barry-Etienne,
  • Dan Eastwood,
  • Nils Högberg,
  • Francis Martin,
  • Håvard Kauserud
Inger Skrede
University of Oslo
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Claude Murat
Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique
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Jaqueline Hess
Universitat Wien Fakultat fur Lebenswissenschaften
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sundy Maurice
University of Oslo
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Jørn Henrik Sønstebø
University of Oslo
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Annegret Kohler
Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique
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Dominique Barry-Etienne
Societe Mycea
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Dan Eastwood
University of Swansea
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Nils Högberg
Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet
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Francis Martin
INRA, UMR1136 INRA-Université de Lorrain
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Håvard Kauserud
University in Oslo
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Abstract

Globalization and international trade have impacted organisms around the world leading to a considerable number of species establishing in new geographic areas. Many organisms have taken advantage of human-made environments, including buildings. One such species is the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans, which is the most aggressive wood-decay fungus in indoor environments in temperate regions. By using population genomic analyses of 36 full genome sequenced isolates, we revealed that isolates from Europe and Japan are highly divergent and that these populations split 3,000 - 19,000 generations ago, probably predating human influence. Approximately 250 generations ago, the European population went through a tight bottleneck, likely corresponding to the time it colonized the built environment. Moreover, evidence of admixture between European and Japanese populations was shown in an isolate from New Zealand. Genomic analyses revealed that low differentiation appeared in genes with functions related to of growth and intracellular transport, possibly important to its ability to effectively decay large substrates. These functions may have enabled both populations to independently establish in the human-made environment. Further, selective sweep analyses identified rapid changes in genes possibly related to decay of various substrates in Japan and in genes involved DNA replication and protein modification in Europe. These two fungal populations were preadapted to the built environment, but have more recently and independently adapted to their local environment.

Peer review status:ACCEPTED

17 Feb 2021Submitted to Molecular Ecology
17 Feb 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
18 Feb 2021Editorial Decision: Revise Minor
15 Mar 20211st Revision Received
15 Mar 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
16 Mar 2021Editorial Decision: Revise Minor
15 Apr 20212nd Revision Received
15 Apr 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
19 Apr 2021Editorial Decision: Accept