loading page

Adverse events associated with weekly short course isoniazid and rifapentine therapy in pediatric patients with latent tuberculosis: a chart and literature review
  • +4
  • Gabrielle Peck,
  • Mary Staat,
  • Felicia Scaggs Huang,
  • Nadim Khalil,
  • Catherine Boyce,
  • Cara Kohlrieser,
  • Elizabeth Schlaudecker
Gabrielle Peck
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Author Profile
Mary Staat
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Author Profile
Felicia Scaggs Huang
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Author Profile
Nadim Khalil
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Author Profile
Catherine Boyce
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Author Profile
Cara Kohlrieser
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Author Profile
Elizabeth Schlaudecker
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Author Profile

Abstract

Background: Effective yet safe treatment of latent tuberculosis is important for preventing the spread of tuberculosis and the progression to active disease in pediatric patients. As of 2017, the short course combination regimen of weekly isoniazid and rifapentine (3HP) administered by directly observed therapy (DOT) has replaced 9 months of isoniazid as the standard of treatment for latent tuberculosis in pediatric patients. The literature, limited in size, has established the 3HP regimen’s superior safety and adherence. Methods: We completed a retrospective chart review (n = 22) of pediatric patients at our institution receiving this regimen between 2017 and 2019. Frequencies of selected outcomes were compared to data collected in a literature review. Results: In this retrospective chart review, pediatric patients ages 2 to 20 years receiving 3HP with DOT for latent tuberculosis experienced higher adverse event rates, more severe adverse events, and higher treatment discontinuation than that which has been previously reported in the literature. A possible explanation for this finding is that our cohort’s race/ethnicity differed from the cohorts used in the literature. Conclusions: Our data suggests that the short course combination regimen for pediatric latent tuberculosis patients may have a higher adverse event rate than previously established. Although this sample size is small, this study urges further investigation of more diverse cohorts to better establish the regimen’s safety and tolerability.

Peer review status:ACCEPTED

15 Feb 2021Submitted to Pediatric Pulmonology
16 Feb 2021Submission Checks Completed
16 Feb 2021Assigned to Editor
23 Feb 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
23 Feb 2021Editorial Decision: Revise Major
19 Mar 20211st Revision Received
22 Mar 2021Submission Checks Completed
22 Mar 2021Assigned to Editor
23 Mar 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
16 Apr 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
16 Apr 2021Editorial Decision: Revise Minor
21 Apr 20212nd Revision Received
26 Apr 2021Submission Checks Completed
26 Apr 2021Assigned to Editor
26 Apr 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
03 May 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
03 May 2021Editorial Decision: Accept