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Impact of a formula combining local impedance and conventional parameters on lesion size prediction
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  • Masateru Takigawa,
  • Masahiko Goya,
  • Hidehiro Iwakawa,
  • Claire Martin,
  • Tatsuhiko Anzai,
  • Kunihiko takahashi,
  • Tatsuaki Kamata,
  • Yu Matsumura,
  • Miki Amemiya,
  • Tasuku Yamamoto,
  • Tatsuhiko Hirao,
  • Masahiro Sekigawa,
  • Yasuhiro Shirai,
  • Susumu Tao,
  • Yoshihide Takahashi,
  • Tetsuo Sasano
Masateru Takigawa
Tokyo Medical and Dental University
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Masahiko Goya
Tokyo Medical and Dental University Hospital
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Hidehiro Iwakawa
Akita University Graduate School of Medicine
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Claire Martin
University of Cambridge
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Tatsuhiko Anzai
Tokyo Medical and Dental University
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Kunihiko takahashi
Tokyo Medical and Dental University
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Tatsuaki Kamata
Tokyo Medical and Dental University
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Yu Matsumura
Tokyo Medical and Dental University
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Miki Amemiya
Tokyo Medical and Dental University
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Tasuku Yamamoto
Tokyo Medical and Dental University
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Tatsuhiko Hirao
Tokyo Medical and Dental University
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Masahiro Sekigawa
Tokyo Medical and Dental University
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Yasuhiro Shirai
Tokyo Medical and Dental University
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Susumu Tao
Tokyo Medical and Dental University
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Yoshihide Takahashi
Tokyo Medical and Dental University
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Tetsuo Sasano
Tokyo Medical and Dental University
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Abstract

Background: Although ablation energy (AE) and force-time integral (FTI) are well-known active predictors of lesion characteristics, these parameters do not reflect passive tissue reactions during ablation, which may instead be represented by drops in local impedance (LI). This study aimed to investigate if additional LI-data improves predicting lesion characteristics and steam-pops. Methods: RF applications at a range of powers (30W, 40W, and 50W), contact forces (8g, 15g, 25g, and 35g), and durations (10-180s) using perpendicular/parallel catheter orientations, were performed in excised porcine hearts (N=30). The correlation between AE, FTI and lesion characteristics was examined and the impact of LI (%LI-drop [%LID] defined by the ΔLI/Initial LI) was additionally assessed. Results: 375 lesions without steam-pops were examined. Ablation energy (W*s) and FTI (g*s) showed a positive correlation with lesion depth (ρ=0.824:P<0.0001 and ρ=0.708:P<0.0001), surface area (ρ=0.507:P<0.0001 and ρ=0.562:P<0.0001) and volume (ρ=0.807:P<0.0001 and ρ=0.685:P<0.0001). %LID also showed positive correlation individually with lesion depth (ρ=0.643:P<0.0001), surface area (ρ=0.547:P<0.0001) and volume (ρ=0.733, P<0.0001). However, the combined indices of AE*%LID and FTI*%LID provided significantly stronger correlation with lesion depth (ρ=0.834:P<0.0001 and ρ=0.809P<0.0001), surface area (ρ=0.529:P<0.0001 and ρ=0.656:P<0.0001) and volume (ρ=0.864:P<0.0001 and ρ=0.838:P<0.0001). This tendency was observed regardless of the catheter placement (parallel/perpendicular). AE (P=0.02) and %LID (P=0.002) independently remained as significant predictors to predict steam-pops (N=27). However, the AE*%LID did not increase the predictive power of steam-pops compared to the AE alone. Conclusion: LI, when combined with conventional parameters (AE and FTI), may provide stronger correlation with lesion characteristics.