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Haematological profile of hospitalised COVID-19 patients from a centre in Singapore
  • +12
  • Valencia Long,
  • Jinghao Nicholas Ngiam,
  • Nicholas WS Chew,
  • Sai Meng Tham,
  • Zhen Yu Lim,
  • Tony Li,
  • Shuyun Cen,
  • Jayagowtham K Annadurai,
  • Sandi Myo Thant,
  • Paul Anantharajah Tambyah,
  • Amelia Santosa,
  • Winnie Ziyun Teo,
  • Eng Soo Yap,
  • Gail Brenda Cross,
  • Ching Hui Sia
Valencia Long
National University Health System
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Jinghao Nicholas Ngiam
National University Health System
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Nicholas WS Chew
National University Heart Centre
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Sai Meng Tham
National University Health System
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Zhen Yu Lim
National University Health System
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Tony Li
National University Health System
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Shuyun Cen
National University Heart Centre
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Jayagowtham K Annadurai
NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine
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Sandi Myo Thant
NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine
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Paul Anantharajah Tambyah
National University Health System
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Amelia Santosa
National University Health System
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Winnie Ziyun Teo
National University Cancer Institute
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Eng Soo Yap
National University Cancer Institute
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Gail Brenda Cross
National University Health System
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Ching Hui Sia
National University Health System
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Abstract

Background: Haematological markers such as absolute lymphopenia has been associated with severe COVID-19 infection. However, the described cohorts were generally unwell with a large proportion of patients requiring intensive care stay. It is uncertain if these markers apply to a population with less severe illness. We sought to describe the haematological profile of patients with mild disease with COVID-19 that were admitted to a single centre in Singapore. Methods: We examined 554 consecutive PCR positive SARS-COV-2 patients who were admitted to a single tertiary healthcare institution from Feb 2020 to April 2020 2020. We examined patients based on their haematological profile based on full blood count obtained within 24h of presentation. Results: Patients with pneumonia had higher neutrophil percentages (66.5±11.6 vs 55.2±12.6%, p<0.001), lower absolute lymphocyte count (1.5±1.1 vs 1.9±2.1 x109/L, p<0.011) and absolute eosinophil count (0.2±0.9 vs 0.7±1.8 x109/L, p=0.002). Platelet counts (210±56 vs 230±61, p=0.020) were slightly lower in the group with pneumonia. We did not demonstrate significant differences in the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio, lymphocyte-monocyte ratio and platelet-lymphocyte ratio in patients with or without pneumonia. Sixty-eight patients (12.3%) had peripheral eosinophilia. This was more common in migrant workers living in dormitories. Conclusion: Neutrophilia and lymphopenia were found to be markers associated with severe COVID-19 illness. We did not find that combined haematological parameters: NLR, MLR and PLR, had any association with disease severity in our cohort of patients with mild-moderate disease. Migrant workers living in dormitories had eosinophilia which may reflect concurrent chronic parasitic infection.