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Does hospitalization of a patient in the intensive care unit cause anxiety and does restriction of visiting cause depression for the relatives of these patients during COVID-19 pandemic?
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  • Behiye Kosovali,
  • Nevzat Mehmet Mutlu,
  • Canan Cam Gonen,
  • Tulay Tuncer Peker,
  • Asiye Yavuz,
  • Ozlem Balkiz Soyal,
  • Esra Cakir,
  • Belgin Akan,
  • Derya Gokcinar,
  • Deniz Erdem,
  • Isil Ozkocak Turan
Behiye Kosovali
Ankara City Hospital
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Nevzat Mehmet Mutlu
Ankara City Hospital
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Canan Cam Gonen
Ankara City Hospital
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Tulay Tuncer Peker
Ankara City Hospital
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Asiye Yavuz
Ankara City Hospital
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Ozlem Balkiz Soyal
Ankara City Hospital
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Esra Cakir
Ankara City Hospital
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Belgin Akan
Ankara City Hospital
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Derya Gokcinar
Ankara City Hospital
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Deniz Erdem
Ankara City Hospital
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Isil Ozkocak Turan
Ankara City Hospital
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Abstract

Objectives: During the pandemic, anxiety, stress, and depression may occur increasingly in the whole society. To evaluate the possible cause, incidence and levels of anxiety and depression in the relatives of the patients in the ICU in accordance with the patients’ SARS-CoV-2 PCR result. Materials and Method: The study was prospectively conducted on relatives of patients admitted to tertiary ICU during COVID-19 pandemic. Sociodemographic characteristics of the patients and their relatives were recorded. “The Turkish version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale” questionnaire was applied twice to the relatives of 120 patients to determine the symptoms of anxiety and depression in accordance with the PCR results of the patients (PCR positive n=60, PCR negative n=60). Results: The ratios above cut-off values for anxiety and depression among relatives of the patients were 45,8% and 67,5% for the first test and 46,7% and 62,5% for the second test respectively. The anxiety and depression in the relatives of PCR positive patients was more frequent than the PCR negative (p< 0,001 for HADS-A and p=0,034 for HADS-D). The prevalence of anxiety and depression was significantly higher in female participants (p=0,046 for HADS-A and p=0,009 for HADS-A). There was no significant correlation between HADS and age of the patient or education of the participants. The fact that the patients were hospitalized in the ICU during the pandemic was an independent risk factor for anxiety (AUC = 0.746) while restriction of patient visiting in the ICU was found to be an independent risk factor for depression (AUC= 0.703). Conclusion: While patient with positive PCR and participant with female gender is responsible for both anxiety and depression, hospitalization in the ICU due to COVID-19 is an independent risk factor for anxiety and restriction of patient visiting in the ICU is an independent risk factor for depression.

Peer review status:ACCEPTED

19 Feb 2021Submitted to International Journal of Clinical Practice
21 Feb 2021Submission Checks Completed
21 Feb 2021Assigned to Editor
24 Feb 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
02 Mar 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
02 Apr 20211st Revision Received
13 Apr 2021Submission Checks Completed
13 Apr 2021Assigned to Editor
13 Apr 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
18 Apr 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
03 May 2021Editorial Decision: Accept