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Reverse Impaired Fasting Glucose in Overweight and Obese Patients Participating in a Self-Paid University Weight Management Program
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  • Vijaya Surampudi ,
  • XinKai Zhou,
  • Chi-Hong Tseng,
  • David Heber,
  • Zhaoping Li
Vijaya Surampudi
UCLA
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XinKai Zhou
UCLA
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Chi-Hong Tseng
UCLA
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David Heber
UCLA
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Zhaoping Li
UCLA
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Abstract

Aims: The progression of prediabetes to T2DM can be delayed through diet modification and weight management. This retrospective review examines the impact on blood sugar, blood pressure, and fasting lipids of a self-pay weight management program utilizing protein-enriched meal replacements and partial meal replacement diets providing 2.2 grams/kg/day of protein in overweight and obese patients with impaired fasting glucose and excess body fat (average %body fat ca. 40%). Methods: The medical records of 4634 obese patient who participated in the self-pay UCLA Weight Management Program were reviewed to identify 2572 eligible patients for this retrospective study of the impact of weight loss over 3 months on patients with normal fasting glucose (NFG) (n=1396) or impaired fasting glucose (IFG) (n=1176). Results: Patients with IFG lost comparable amounts of weight (ca. 10 kg) at three months as did the subjects with NFG. Fasting blood glucose in the IFG group decreased from 108.49 ± 6.4 mg/dl to 101.8 ±9.41 mg/dl (p<0.0001) after three months. There were also significant reductions in triglycerides, and both systolic and diastolic blood pressure in both groups in association with weight loss. Conclusion: Our medically supervised self-pay multidisciplinary weight management program utilizing protein-enriched diets and meal replacements reduced fasting blood glucose levels in patients with IFG while reducing triglycerides and blood pressure in all patients over three months.