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Oxidant and Antioxidant Balance in Patients with COVID-19
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  • Kubra Aykac,
  • yasemin ozsurekci,
  • Burcu Ceylan Cura Yayla,
  • Sibel Lacinel Gurlevik ,
  • Pembe Derin Oygar,
  • Nuriye Boduc,
  • Medine Tasar,
  • Fatma Erdinc,
  • Gunay Ertem,
  • Salim Neselioglu,
  • Ozcan Erel,
  • Ali Bülent Cengiz,
  • Mehmet Ceyhan
Kubra Aykac
Ankara Training and Research Hospital
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yasemin ozsurekci
Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine
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Burcu Ceylan Cura Yayla
Saglik Bakanligi Ankara Egitim ve Arastirma Hastanesi
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Sibel Lacinel Gurlevik
Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine
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Pembe Derin Oygar
Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine
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Nuriye Boduc
Ankara Training and Research Hospital
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Medine Tasar
Ankara Training and Research Hospital
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Fatma Erdinc
Ankara Training and Research Hospital Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology Clinic
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Gunay Ertem
Ankara Training and Research Hospital Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology Clinic
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Salim Neselioglu
Yildirim Beyazit University Faculty of Medicine
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Ozcan Erel
Yildirim Beyazit University Faculty of Medicine
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Ali Bülent Cengiz
Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine
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Mehmet Ceyhan
Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine
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Abstract

Background: A crucial balance exists between oxidant and antioxidant mechanisms in the functional immune system. We aimed to evaluate the contributions of balance between these systems to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a devastating pandemic caused by viral infection. Method: We analyzed serum oxidant and antioxidant stress parameters according to the clinical and demographic characteristics of children and adults with COVID-19 and compared them against the values of healthy controls. Serum native thiol (NT), total thiol (TT), disulfide, total antioxidant status, total oxidant status, and ischemia-modified albumin levels were evaluated and compared between groups. Results: A total of 79 children and 74 adults were evaluated in the present study, including 46 children and 40 adults with COVID-19, 33 healthy children, and 34 healthy adults. TT, NT, and disulfide levels were significantly lower in the adult COVID-19 group than in all other groups (p = 0.001, p = 0.001, and p = 0.005, respectively). Additionally, TT and NT levels were significantly lower in both pediatric and adult COVID-19 cases with severe disease course than mild/moderate course. TT and NT levels were identified as predictors for the diagnosis of the adult COVID-19 cases and as independent predictors for disease severity in both children and adults with COVID-19. Conclusion: Parameters that reveal the oxidant and antioxidant capacity, including TT and NT, appear to be good candidates for the accurate prediction of the clinical course among patients with COVID-19.

Peer review status:ACCEPTED

01 Mar 2021Submitted to Pediatric Pulmonology
01 Mar 2021Submission Checks Completed
01 Mar 2021Assigned to Editor
06 Mar 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
18 Mar 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
18 Apr 2021Editorial Decision: Revise Minor
30 Apr 20211st Revision Received
03 May 2021Submission Checks Completed
03 May 2021Assigned to Editor
03 May 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
24 May 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
08 Jun 2021Editorial Decision: Accept