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Unlocking the potential plant growth-promoting properties of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) seed endophytes bio-inoculants for improving the soil health and crop production
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  • Arpan Mukherjee,
  • Anand Gaurav,
  • Amit Patel,
  • Saurabh Singh,
  • Gowardhan Chouhan,
  • Arthur Pereira,
  • JAY PRAKASH VERMA
Arpan Mukherjee
Banaras Hindu University Institute of Environment & Sustainable Development
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Anand Gaurav
Banaras Hindu University Institute of Environment & Sustainable Development
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Amit Patel
Banaras Hindu University Institute of Environment & Sustainable Development
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Saurabh Singh
Banaras Hindu University Institute of Environment & Sustainable Development
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Gowardhan Chouhan
Banaras Hindu University Institute of Environment & Sustainable Development
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Arthur Pereira
Federal University of Ceara
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JAY PRAKASH VERMA
Institute of Environment and Sustainable Development
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Abstract

Sustainable agronomic practices are tried all over the world to promote safe and eco-friendly crop production. Therefore, in the present study, the effect of seed endophytic bacteria and its consortia on soil biochemical property, soil nutrient, and yield of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) under field and pot conditions are investigated. Both the experimental results proved a significant increase in total soil organic carbon (OC), electric conductivity (EC), organic matter (OM), soil nutrient like available N, P and K content and important soil enzymes like dehydrogenase (DHA), beta glucosidase, alkaline phosphate, and urease was observed under the Enterobacter hormaechei BHUJPCS-15 (T1), Enterobacter cloacae BHUJPCS-21 (T2) and combined T3 (consortia of T1 and T2) treatments. Similarly, a significant increase in the grain yield (27-45% and 57-73%) in microbial treatment was found in pot and field experiments, respectively than control. In addition, whereas the higher plant biomass (14-38% and 42-78%) was recorded in the treated plant over the control plant. Similarly, the plant photosynthetic pigment (Chl a, b, total Chl) were also increased in the microbial treated plant than the control untreated chickpea plant. Our present study highlights the significance of sustainable agronomic practices for improving the soil quality and agricultural yield while reducing adverse impacts of chemicals by the use of seed endophytic microbes and their consortia.

Peer review status:IN REVISION

01 Feb 2021Submitted to Land Degradation & Development
02 Feb 2021Assigned to Editor
02 Feb 2021Submission Checks Completed
08 Mar 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
09 Apr 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
19 Apr 2021Editorial Decision: Revise Major