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Association between maternal ritodrine hydrochloride administration during pregnancy and childhood wheezing up to three years of age: The Japan Environment and Children’s Study
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  • Tsuyoshi Murata,
  • Hyo Kyozuka,
  • Shun Yasuda,
  • Toma Fukuda,
  • Akiko Yamaguchi,
  • Hajime Maeda,
  • Akiko Sato,
  • Yuka Ogata,
  • Kosei Shinoki,
  • Mitsuaki Hosoya,
  • Seiji Yasumura,
  • Koichi Hashimoto,
  • Hidekazu Nishigori,
  • Keiya Fujimori
Tsuyoshi Murata
Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine
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Hyo Kyozuka
Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine
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Shun Yasuda
Fukushima Medical University
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Toma Fukuda
Fukushima Medical University
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Akiko Yamaguchi
Fukushima Medical University
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Hajime Maeda
Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine
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Akiko Sato
Fukushima Regional Center for the Japan Environmental and Children's Study
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Yuka Ogata
Fukushima Regional Center for the Japan Environmental and Children’s Study
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Kosei Shinoki
Fukushima Regional Center for the Japan Environmental and Children’s Study
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Mitsuaki Hosoya
Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine
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Seiji Yasumura
Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine
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Koichi Hashimoto
Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine
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Hidekazu Nishigori
Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine
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Keiya Fujimori
Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine
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Abstract

Background: The effects of maternal ritodrine hydrochloride administration (MRA) during pregnancy on fetuses and offspring are not entirely clear. The present study aimed to evaluate the association between MRA and childhood wheezing using data from a nationwide Japanese birth cohort study. Methods: This study retrospectively analyzed data from the Japan Environment and Children’s Study, a nationwide birth cohort study, conducted between 2011 and 2014. Data of women with singleton births after 22 weeks of gestation were analyzed. The participants were divided according to MRA status. Considering childhood factors affecting the incidence of wheezing, a logistic regression model was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios for “wheezing ever,” diagnosis of asthma in the last 12 months, and “asthma ever” in women with MRA, with women who did not receive MRA as the reference. Participants were stratified by term births, and adjusted odds ratios for outcomes were calculated using a logistic regression model. Results: A total of 68,123 participants were analyzed. The adjusted odds ratio for wheezing ever was 1.17 (95% confidence interval, 1.12–1.22). The adjusted odds ratios for the other outcomes did not significantly increase after adjusting for childhood factors. The same tendency was confirmed after excluding women with preterm births. Conclusion: MRA was associated with an increased incidence of childhood wheezing up to three years, irrespective of term births or preterm births. It is important that perinatal physicians consider both the adverse maternal side effects of MRA and its potential effects on the offspring’s childhood.

Peer review status:ACCEPTED

14 Mar 2021Submitted to Pediatric Allergy and Immunology
17 Mar 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
01 Apr 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
07 Apr 2021Editorial Decision: Revise Major
26 Apr 20211st Revision Received
26 Apr 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
27 Apr 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
13 May 2021Editorial Decision: Accept