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The relationship between mixed vaginitis in late pregnancy and adverse pregnancy outcomes:a cross-sectional study.
  • +7
  • huanrong li,
  • Mengting Dong,
  • Wenjuan Xie,
  • Wenhui Qi,
  • Fei Teng,
  • Huiyang Li,
  • Ye Yan,
  • Chen Wang,
  • Cha Han,
  • Fengxia Xue
huanrong li
Tianjin Medical University General Hospital
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Mengting Dong
Tianjin Medical University General Hospital
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Wenjuan Xie
Tianjin Medical University General Hospital
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Wenhui Qi
Tianjin Medical University General Hospital
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Fei Teng
Tianjin Medical University General Hospital
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Huiyang Li
Tianjin Medical University General Hospital
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Ye Yan
Tianjin Medical University General Hospital
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Chen Wang
Tianjin Medical University General Hospital
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Cha Han
Tianjin Medical University General Hospital
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Fengxia Xue
Tianjin Medical University General Hospital
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Abstract

Objective:To clarify the epidemiological characteristics, risk factors, clinical symptoms and signs, laboratory features, and pregnancy outcomes of women with mixed vaginitis during late pregnancy. Methods:The study population consisted of 1103 women in late pregnancy who attended the Tianjin Medical University General Hospital from November 2019 to September 2020. Results:The incidence rate of mixed vaginitis during late pregnancy is 4.1% (44/1075). The independent risk factors for women with mixed vaginitis in late pregnancy are a positive glucose tolerance test (OR = 2.697, 95% CI 1.293-5.625) and a history of vaginitis during pregnancy (OR = 2.276, 95% CI 1.030-5.032). Compared with women with single vaginitis, women with mixed vaginitis only have statistically significant differences in the yellow discharge (77.3% vs. 58.9%) and malodor (40.9% vs. 22.7%) (P<0.05), so they are easily confused with single vaginitis in clinical symptoms and signs. Compared with women with single vaginitis, women with mixed vaginitis have a significant difference in pH>4.5 (72.7% vs. 36.2%) and WBC>10/hpf (81.8% vs. 38%) in laboratory examination(P<0.05). Therefore, laboratory diagnosis is the main method to distinguish single and mixed vaginitis. Compared with women without vaginitis, women with mixed vaginitis have an increased incidence of postpartum puerperal infections (6.8% vs. 1%; P<0.05). Conclusions:Mixed vaginitis in late pregnancy leads to an increased incidence of puerperal infections. Therefore, more attention should be paid to the early intervention of mixed vaginitis during pregnancy to prevent adverse pregnancy outcomes.