loading page

Efficacy of an adrenaline auto-injector diary for patients allergic to foods or insect stings
  • +1
  • Taku Oishi,
  • Kouhei Hagino,
  • Hajime Kuroiwa,
  • Mikiya Fujieda
Taku Oishi
Kochi Medical School
Author Profile
Kouhei Hagino
Hata Kenmin Hospital
Author Profile
Hajime Kuroiwa
Kochi Medical School
Author Profile
Mikiya Fujieda
Kochi Medical School
Author Profile

Abstract

Background: Adrenaline auto-injectors (AAIs) are not used correctly by patients and their caregivers because of a lack of training. The aim of this study was to determine how to help patients maintain proper use of AAIs. Methods: Patients prescribed AAIs or their caregivers were recruited. At enrollment, they were asked to demonstrate use of a ‘trainer’ device, and they were given a calendar as a diary. They were asked to mark the days they practice for a year. After one year, their performance was re-evaluated. Their skills were evaluated in five steps that consisted of a) how to hold the AAI, b) removing the cap, c) selecting the mid-anterolateral thigh as the correct site of injection, d) holding firmly in place for 5 seconds, and e) massaging after injection. The primary endpoint was the percentage of participants that correctly used the AAI one year after enrollment. Results: A total of 102 participants were enrolled. At enrollment, of the 82 participants who had previous AAI prescriptions, 38 (46.3%) used it correctly. Except for evaluation items d) and e), 55 of 82 (67.1%) used it correctly. Ninety-seven participants could be confirmed after one year, and 81 of them (83.5%) used the AAI correctly. Conclusion: Distributing the diary was effective in maintaining AAI skill. It is thought that the diary helped participants maintain their motivation to practice using the AAI.