loading page

Isolation and Characterization of Seneca Valley Virus Spread from Pig to Mink
  • +8
  • Chao Chen,
  • Zida Nai,
  • Yao Wang,
  • Ziliang Qin,
  • Qinjian Niu,
  • Yuwen Li,
  • Yaguang Tian,
  • Yuhui Ma,
  • Xinmiao He,
  • Di Liu,
  • Xinpeng Jiang
Chao Chen
Northeast Agricultural University
Author Profile
Zida Nai
Northeast Agricultural University
Author Profile
Yao Wang
Northeast Agricultural University
Author Profile
Ziliang Qin
Northeast Agricultural University
Author Profile
Qinjian Niu
Northeast Agricultural University
Author Profile
Yuwen Li
Northeast Agricultural University
Author Profile
Yaguang Tian
Northeast Agricultural University
Author Profile
Yuhui Ma
Animal Husbandry and Veterinary Development Center of Zhaosu
Author Profile
Xinmiao He
Heilongjiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences
Author Profile
Di Liu
Heilongjiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences
Author Profile
Xinpeng Jiang
Northeast Agricultural University
Author Profile

Abstract

Seneca Valley Virus (SVV) infection has recently spread to pig farms in Canada, America, and China. Humans, mice, and houseflies have been identified as hosts and reservoirs. Although such cross-species transmission events are often limited, sustained outbreaks in a new mammalian host can occur. To determine if mink are a new mammalian host of SSV, we studied the molecular characteristics of isolated SVV genomes and analyzed challenge, pathology, and immune response data. The study was the first systemic analysis of a newly isolated strain of SVV from pigs. The strain caused an intestinal infection with associated pathologic changes in mink. SVV stimulated the production of a specific neutralizing antibody. The findings highlight the importance of identifying SVV infection in mink and the host to detect mutated SSV that could threaten livestock and pose public health and economic risks.